contralateral hemiplegia

con·tra·lat·er·al hem·i·ple·gi·a

characteristic presentation of a lesion of the descending motor pathways proximal to the decussation, in which the resulting limb weakness is on the side opposite to the brain lesion.

con·tra·lat·er·al hem·i·ple·gi·a

(kon'tră-lat'ĕr-ăl hem'ē-plē'jē-ă)
Paralysis occurring on the side opposite to the causal central lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) It is also important to note the possibility of severe neurological complications, such as encephalitis and prolonged contralateral hemiplegia.
In 1906, Spanish otorhinolaryngologist Antonio Garcia Tapia became the first to describe a lesion of the vagus and hypoglossal nerves with contralateral hemiplegia.
4] Occlusion of the superior trunk of the middle cerebral artery will result in the following symptoms: contralateral hemiplegia and hemianesthesia in the face and arm with lesser involvement of the lower extremity, ipsilateral deviation of eyes and head, and Broca's aphasia (with dominant hemisphere occlusion).
12] When the posterior cerebral artery is occluded, the clinical symptoms include contralateral hemiplegia, sensory loss and ipsilateral visual field deficits.
8,17] Occlusion of the anterior choroidal artery results in contralateral hemiplegia, hemihypesthesia and homonymous hemianopia.