contraction band necrosis


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con·trac·tion band

a microscopic change in myocardial cells in which excessive contraction, associated with elevated intracellular calcium and serum norepinephrine, causes the formation of transverse amorphous bands in the fibers which are then incapable of contracting again.

contraction band necrosis

A nonspecific finding in irreversibly ischaemic myocytes, often the only (albeit unreliable) histologic change seen in hyperacute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death, where central coagulated cells are arrested in a relaxed state and reperfusion around the infarct results in cell death “frozen” in a hypercontracted state, spanning the cell’s width.
 
DiffDx
Reperfusion injury, electrocution, selenium deficiency (Keshan disease), infarction, defibrillation, in skeletal muscle in Duchenne and Becker types of muscular dystrophy, drug therapy (e.g., with corticosteroids), catecholamines, abuse substances (e.g., amphetamines, cocaine).
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on this study, they encouraged the use of the words "contraction band necrosis" for a specific morphofunctional entity caused by increased concentrations to catecholamines, and they calculated a histologic threshold of 37 [+ or -] 7 foci per 100 m2 tissue as an indication of severe sympathetic stress.
Contraction band necrosis, an early marker of irreversible myocyte injury (34, 39), was identified in 4 of the 10 nonsurvivors (without cardiac cause of death).
However, the concept of cardiac arrest caused by catecholamine myotoxicity associated with ventricular fibrillation is suggested by (1) the finding of contraction band necrosis or disseminated focal necrosis, as encountered in other cases,[10,15] and by (2) an experimental study in which AAS, administered in combination with exercise training, induced degenerative changes within the intracardiac sympathetic neurons of the mouse.[23]