contract

(redirected from contractibility)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

con·tract

(kon-trakt'),
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

contract

(kən-trăkt′, kŏn′trăkt′)
v.
1. To reduce in size by drawing together; shrink.
2. To become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together, as the pupil of the eye.
3. To acquire or incur by contagion or infection.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

contract

A written, dated and signed agreement between two or more parties, which sets out any arrangements on delegation and distribution of tasks and obligations, and, if appropriate, on financial matters. A clinical trial protocol may serve as the basis for a contract.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

contract

Managed care A health care policy or plan in which a provider offers certain services delineated in writing, to which the purchaser–Pt agrees by signature. See Guaranteed renewable contract, Provider risk contract, Subscriber contract.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. Explicit bilateral commitment by dentist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of therapy.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. To shorten; to become reduced in size.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
We now end this paper by giving an example showing that, under the condition of Theorem 32, we only have the contractibility of fixed point sets but not the convexity.
Does asset contractibility matter for the degree of insurance and the time profiles of consumption and savings?
The changes in exercise heart rate may be explained by increased stroke volume and improved contractibility of the heart muscle.
All 15 patients initially treated with BTX achieved a highly statistically significant reduction or improvement in their glabellar frown lines, most particularly in attempts at full muscle contractibility. Patients randomized to placebo had a mean preinjection severity score of 3.86 [+ or -] 1.13 and a postinjection severity score of 3 78 [+ or -] 1.42.
A randomized trial in patients with chronic venous insufficiency showed that horse chestnut seed extract improves contractibility of blood vessel walls, thereby improving circulation, reducing leakage through capillaries, and preventing edema compared with a control group.
The analysis in this paper provides the scaffolding for assessing the net burden of regulation, but the real heavy lifting requires a more detailed explication of the nature of and limits to contractibility in these markets.
As a sympathomimetic agonist at both [alpha]- and [beta]-adrenergic receptors, ephedrine enhances cardiac rate and contractibility, peripheral vasoconstriction, bronchodilation, and central nervous system stimulation.
[a fiduciary] relationship, that relationship must be examined to see what duties are thereby imposed upon the agent, to see what is the scope and ambit of the duties charged upon him.' As to the contractibility of fiduciary obligations, see Nolan, above n 82, 420-1.
* Limits to contractibility, for the procurement of resources, because of tacit, idiosyncratic and context-dependent knowledge.
An examination of BE in children with specific language impairment: the role of contractibility and grammatical form class.
Students can see such things as the role of the kidneys in some forms of hypertension, the importance of increased contractibility of the heart when distended, and the importance of venous return in the control of the circulation.
In giving this instruction, the implicit contracts approach makes a significant assumption--that the zone of contractibility is universal and that incomplete contracts always can be completed.