contract

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con·tract

(kon-trakt'),
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

contract

(kən-trăkt′, kŏn′trăkt′)
v.
1. To reduce in size by drawing together; shrink.
2. To become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together, as the pupil of the eye.
3. To acquire or incur by contagion or infection.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

contract

A written, dated and signed agreement between two or more parties, which sets out any arrangements on delegation and distribution of tasks and obligations, and, if appropriate, on financial matters. A clinical trial protocol may serve as the basis for a contract.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

contract

Managed care A health care policy or plan in which a provider offers certain services delineated in writing, to which the purchaser–Pt agrees by signature. See Guaranteed renewable contract, Provider risk contract, Subscriber contract.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. Explicit bilateral commitment by dentist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of therapy.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. To shorten; to become reduced in size.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Widh low complexity and low asset specificity, multiple contractees should not be unduly costly.
Government departments reduce lock-in by specifying hand-over procedures, obliging contractees to use common standards, and requiring transparent procedures and detailed system documentation.
It is relatively easy to solve the informational public-good problem within a single national government: most national governments provided central assistance in drawing up and monitoring contracts, whether by means of model contracts and guidelines, legal advice, or information of contractees (OECD, 1992; 12).
Steven Globerman and Aidan Vining argue that contracting out is justified only when one can expect to lower the sum of production costs and the costs of managing the relationship [between government and the contractee (transaction costs).
For example, specifying and measuring the quality of food served by a contractee is relatively easy.
During contract negotiations, a potential contractee in a market with limited contestability is tempted to offer services at a price above marginal cost (or average cost in circumstances where average cost is declining for the demanded good).
The government "player" can anticipate what the optimal strategy in each period of the game will be for the other player (the contractee) and then, by backward induction, identify the government's optimal strategy in each period.
We now apply the framework to various combinations of task complexity, contestability, and asset specificity.(8) In cases of high asset specificity, an additional variable is introduced, because it is also important to identify whether it is the government or the contractee that is potentially liable to make the specific investments and, thus, subject to opportunism.
There are likely to be few efficiency costs arising from high asset specificity if the government makes the relevant specific investments, because it is not costly to replace the contractee (given high contestability).
These problems can be avoided if the government owns the specific asset and rents or leases it to the contractee. Monteverde and Teece (1982) point out chat the same problem and the same solution arise in the private sector.
The contractee might fully meet its contract obligations in terms of prisoner custody and training but (opportunistically) undermaintain the building.
Low contestability increases potential for contractee opportunism because the government cannot easily replace the supplier.