contract


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con·tract

(kon-trakt'),
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]

contract

(kən-trăkt′, kŏn′trăkt′)
v.
1. To reduce in size by drawing together; shrink.
2. To become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together, as the pupil of the eye.
3. To acquire or incur by contagion or infection.

contract

A written, dated and signed agreement between two or more parties, which sets out any arrangements on delegation and distribution of tasks and obligations, and, if appropriate, on financial matters. A clinical trial protocol may serve as the basis for a contract.

contract

Managed care A health care policy or plan in which a provider offers certain services delineated in writing, to which the purchaser–Pt agrees by signature. See Guaranteed renewable contract, Provider risk contract, Subscriber contract.

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. Explicit bilateral commitment by dentist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of therapy.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. To shorten; to become reduced in size.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
References in periodicals archive ?
HOUSTON (4) _ Signed Luke Gregerson, rhp, Oakland, to an $18.5 million, four-year contract; signed Pat Neshek, rhp, St.
In other words, regardless of the number of: (a) contracts that the named insured enters, (b) additional insureds which may have rights under the policy, and (c) losses that may be experienced, the insurance company has contracted to provide one aggregate limit that will be available during the policy period to all parties.
(2) The contract's obligations are not directly or indirectly secured; and
Alternatively, the messenger may receive authority from individual providers to accept contract offers that meet certain criteria as long as the messenger does not negotiate on the provider's behalf.
Why is it important that DoD leadership insist on better contract management and administration, aside from the obvious reasons of obeying the law, following regulations, and protecting the government's interest?
Keith Ashdown of the nonpartisan watchdog group Taxpayers for Common Sense calls the Eskimo loophole a "magnet for mischief." The Government Accountability Office has launched a probe into whether federal agencies are paying far more for contracts than they should.
INPUT estimates that only 50 SDVOBs received $1 million or more in federal IT prime contract business last year, with no small SDVOBs eclipsing $40 million in total prime contract federal IT spending.
Being able to recognize contract language as a risk factor--and having a plan to analyze it and respond to it--is just as important as having a plan to reduce risk at the waterfront.
The PROS II contract simulates all of the government's procurement activities required to provide logistic requirements support.
(1) A state member bank is authorized to invest in the asset underlying the contract;

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