contour

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con·tour

(kon'tūr),
1. The outline of a part; the surface configuration.
2. In dentistry, to restore the normal outlines or form of a tooth, or to create the external shape or form of a prosthesis.
[L. con- (intens.), + torno, to turn (in a lathe), fr. tornus, a lathe]

contour

/con·tour/ (kon´tldbomacr) [Fr.]
1. the normal outline or configuration of the body or of a part.
2. to shape a solid along certain desired lines.

contour

[kon′to̅o̅r]
Etymology: Fr
1 n, the normal outline or configuration of the body or of a part.
2 v, to shape a solid along certain desired lines.

con·tour

(kon'tūr)
1. The outline of a part; the surface configuration.
2. dentistry To restore the normal outlines of a broken or otherwise misshapen tooth, or to create the external shape or form of a prosthesis.
[L. con- (intens.), + torno, to turn (in a lathe), fr. tornus, a lathe]

contour 

The outline of a part of a retinal image where the light intensity changes abruptly corresponding to the boundaries of objects in the visual field. The physiological basis of contour perception and edge detection is thought to be mediated by the responses of complex and hypercomplex cells in area V1 of the primary visual cortex.
Illusory contour's (subjective contours) are contours perceived in the absence of a lightness or colour difference as in the Kanizsa figure. They are thought to be processed in area V2 of the visual cortex. See visual association areas; parvocellular visual system.
contour interaction See Glasgow acuity cards; crowding phenomenon.

con·tour

(kon'tūr)
1. In dentistry, to restore normal outlines or form of a tooth or create external shape or form of a prosthesis.
2. The outline of a part; the surface configuration.
[L. con- (intens.), + torno, to turn (in a lathe), fr. tornus, a lathe]

contour (kon´tōōr),

n the external shape, form, or surface configuration of an object.
contour, anatomic height of
n a line encircling a tooth to designate its greatest convexity.
contour, buccal,
n the shape of the buccal aspect of a posterior tooth. It normally has occlusocervical convexity, with its greatest prominence at the gingival third of the clinical buccal surface.
contour, gingival,
n the shape of the natural or artificial gingiva as it approximates the natural or artificial tooth.
contour, height of,
n the greatest convexity of a tooth viewed from a predetermined position.
contour, proximal
n the form of the mesial or distal surface of a tooth.
contour, restoration,
n the restoration of a proper contour where surfaces of teeth have been destroyed by disease processes or excessive wear.
contour, tooth,
n a shape of a tooth that is essential to a healthy gingival unit because it enables the bolus of food to be deflected from gingival margins during mastication.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, three cell types are defined concerning the relationships between contours and cells: no-value (NVC), single-value (SVC), and multi-value (MVC) cells, which indicate no contour lines, a single contour line, or multiple contour lines passing through the cell, respectively.
Exactly when and where the method of filing in beaded backgrounds with contour lines developed, even who developed the idea, will probably never be known.
The kids love this analogy and it forces them to remember to not lift their drawing pencil and focus on making their contour lines continuous.
Daniel says: "Apply contour under cheekbones to reduce the look of puffiness and gently shade around the sides of the nose to help it look slimmer.
The left and right contours of the vertebral bodies from L1 to L5 vertically are extended up to 16%, and ventral and dorsal contours of the vertebral bodies are lengthened to only 5%.
The considerations mentioned above lead to new expressions of the electric energy by which magnetic contours interacts each other.
Often, the contours of the characters are already available in another CAD system.
Several ways of creating power contours exist, including load-pull measurements, simulation of nonlinear models (if available) and the Cripps method.
This can be seen in the evaltrace diagram given in Figure 3, where three distinct lexical contours are shown (not counting the one for +), each containing a variable named N.
Contours Express Set to Grow Size of Company Using Campaigns Comparing Benefits of Real Weights to Hydraulic Exercise Equipment