analgesia

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Related to continuous epidural analgesia: epidural anesthesia, epidural anaesthesia, continuous epidural anesthesia

analgesia

 [an″al-je´ze-ah]
absence of sensibility to pain, particularly the relief of pain without loss of consciousness; absence of pain or noxious stimulation.
continuous epidural analgesia continuous injection of an anesthetic solution into the sacral and lumbar plexuses within the epidural space to relieve the pain of childbirth, in general surgery to block the pain pathways below the navel, or to relieve chronic unremitting pain.
epidural analgesia analgesia induced by introduction of the analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal.
infiltration analgesia infiltration anesthesia.
patient controlled analgesia (PCA) an apparatus used to relieve acute pain. It consists of a pump attached to an intravenous or subcutaneous injection site and filled with multiple doses of medication that are available when the system is activated by the patient. The pump is programmed to “lock-out” the patient for specified intervals making overdosage unlikely.
patient controlled epidural analgesia patient controlled analgesia in which a narcotic or local anesthetic is administered into the epidural space via a catheter.
relative analgesia in dental anesthesia, a maintained level of conscious sedation short of general anesthesia, usually induced by inhalation of nitrous oxide and oxygen.
transdermal analgesia a method of pain control in which a patch with a rate-controlling membrane is applied to the skin; the medication is deposited in the upper layers of the skin where it is absorbed into the systemic circulation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·al·ge·si·a

(an'ăl-jē'zē-ă), Do not confuse this word with anesthesia.
A neurologic or pharmacologic state in which painful stimuli are moderated such that, although still perceived, they are no longer painful. Compare: anesthesia.
[G. insensibility, fr. an- priv. + algēsis, sensation of pain]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

analgesia

(ăn′əl-jē′zē-ə, -zhə)
n.
A deadening or absence of the sense of pain without loss of consciousness.

an′al·get′ic (-jĕt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

analgesia

The process of relieving or reducing pain; a state of insensitivity to pain, due to:
(1) Pharmacotherapy with an analgesic.
(2) Derangement of sensation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·al·ge·si·a

(an'ăl-jē'zē-ă)
1. A neurologic or pharmacologic state in which painful stimuli are so moderated that, although still perceptible, they are no longer painful.
Compare: anesthesia
2. Denotes process of relieving pain.
[G. insensibility, fr. an- priv. + algēsis, sensation of pain]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Analgesia

A state of insensitivity to pain even though the person remains fully conscious.
Mentioned in: Anesthesia, General
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·al·ge·si·a

(an'ăl-jē'zē-ă) Do not confuse this word with anesthesia.
A neurologic or pharmacologic state in which painful stimuli are moderated such that, although still perceived, they are no longer painful.
[G. insensibility, fr. an- priv. + algēsis, sensation of pain]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about analgesia

Q. NO FEELING IN FEET

A. I am not sure I fully understand the situation. Is this no feeling in your feet a chronic symptom or is it new? Chronic loss of sensation in distal parts of your body can result from diabetes (damage to nerve endings) or also PVD- peripheral vascular disease. It depends on your age and how long you have been experiencing this. The treatment varies depending on the cause. Either way you should have a doctor examine you.

More discussions about analgesia
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References in periodicals archive ?
Continuous epidural analgesia for painless labor does not increase the incidence of cesarean delivery.
Royal College of Anaesthetists, Royal College of Nursing, The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland et al 2004 Good practice in the management of continuous epidural analgesia in the hospital setting London, RCoA Available from: www.britishpainsociety.org/Epid-Analg.pdf Accessed 8 July 2008]
Enrollment criteria included more than 37 weeks' gestation, vertex singleton presentation, normal fetal heart status, and effective continuous epidural analgesia. The average age of participants was 28 years, and more than 94% were white or Asian; other risk factors were not described.
The effect of rate of infusion on continuous epidural analgesia for labor and delivery.

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