continent


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con·ti·nent

(kon'ti-nent),
Denoting continence.

continent

(kŏn′tə-nənt)
adj.
Exercising continence.

con′ti·nent·ly adv.

continent

Referring to continence, see there.

con·ti·nent

(kon'ti-nĕnt)
1. Able to retain urine or stool.
2. Referring to an enterostomy with sphincterlike control.
See also: continence
References in periodicals archive ?
For it to be classified as a continent it has to meet five criteria, all of which have been fulfilled in this case: 
On Monday, the Presidency said Africa is in fact the second biggest continent in terms of population size, and the biggest continent in this regard is Asia.
Convinced that our continent is able to foster the much-awaited "African miracle", the Kingdom of Morocco is making every effort for the emergence of an African continent that is proud of its identity, derives its strength from its spiritual and cultural heritage, a continent that is liberated from the yoke and shackles of the past, free from any inferiority complex, and asserting itself as a modern, ambitious and enterprising Africa," the Monarch said.
Could I also add that apart from just our leaders' shortcomings, other vices such as mismanagement, nepotism, corruption, poor governance etc are contributing to the demise of the African continent.
The continent Asia has about forty seven small and big countries: Afghanistan Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, East Timor, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, North Korea, South Korea, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, and Yemen.
PUJA MEHTA DIXIT, the President of PV Hotels said; "We are pleased to be working with Continent brand franchise, and look forward to developing and re branding hotels.
Both bear witness to the continent, using their eyes and, later, their pens.
The problems of the continent are summarized with acuity and learning and presented in an academic style.
Dikedi, a Nigerian based in London, has visited Africa some 20 times in the last five years, travelling all over the continent.
As a result, ancient glaciations were seen as highly unusual events ('slow motion catastrophes'; Bolles, 1999) and as such were of chronostratigraphic value because such events could be precisely correlated from one continent to another (e.
A Continent for the Taking: The Traged and Hope of Africa, his vivid, disquieting memoir of those times, conjures up a succession of flailed states in which the shakedown is a way of life, destitute soldiers terrorize civilians at will, and the slightest display of weakness becomes an invitation for predation.