contamination

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contamination

 [kon-tam″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the soiling or making inferior by contact or mixture, as by introduction of organisms into a wound.
2. the deposition of radioactive material in any place where it is not desired, especially where its presence may be harmful or constitute a radiation hazard.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·tam·i·na·tion

(kon-tam'i-nā'shŭn),
1. The presence of an infectious agent on a body surface; also on or in clothes, bedding, toys, surgical instruments or dressings, or other inanimate articles or substances including water, milk, and food, or that infectious agent itself.
2. In epidemiology, the situation that exists when a population being studied for one condition or factor also possesses other conditions or factors that modify results of the study.
3. Freudian term for a fusion and condensation of meanings of words, percepts, or motivations for behavior.
4. The presence of foreign material that adulterates or renders impure a material the composition of which is thereby degraded.
[L. contamino, pp. -atus, to stain, defile]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

contamination

Pollution by an inferior material Infectious disease Introduction of organisms in a wound. See Cross contamination Public health The presence of any foreign or undesired material in a system–eg, toxic contamination of the ground water in an ecosystem or untreated sewage into a stream Radiation physics The deposition of radioactive material in any place where it is not wanted. See Radioactive contamination.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·tam·i·na·tion

(kŏn-tam'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The presence of an infectious agent on a body surface or on or in clothes, bedding, toys, surgical instruments or dressings, or other inanimate articles or substances including water, milk, and food, or that infectious agent itself.
2. That portion of a chemical, biologic, or radiologic agent that remains on (external contamination) or in(internal contamination) a victim or inanimate object, especially, but not necessarily, after evaporation and absorption.
3. epidemiology The situation that exists when a population being studied for one condition or factor alsopossesses other conditions or factors that modify results of the study.
4. psychology/psychiatry Freudian term for a fusion and condensation of words.
See also: residual dose contamination
[L. contamino, pp. -atus, to stain, defile]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Contamination

Passage of an infectious organism, such as a virus, from an infected person to an object such as a needle, which then, when used, may pass infection to another person.
Mentioned in: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis C
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·tam·i·na·tion

(kŏn-tam'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The presence of an infectious agent on or in something.
2. In epidemiology, the situation that exists when a population being studied for one condition or factor also possesses other conditions or factors that modify results of the study.
3. The presence of foreign material that adulterates or renders impure a material the composition of which is thereby degraded.
[L. contamino, pp. -atus, to stain, defile]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about contamination

Q. I'm concerned that my calcium supplements are contaminated w seashells or cow bones. Which brands are best

A. there should be labeled as "from animal source".
here is something that helped me choose:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/calcium-supplements/AN00964

More discussions about contamination
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bacterial contamination of blood and its products is an exceptionally basic transfusion related hazard worldwide but unfortunately in Pakistan it was overlooked.
Table: Frequency of platelets contamination in different countries.
Cross contamination of non-sterilisable appliances in the dental clinics and laboratories may potentially be a health hazard to the members of the dental team.
Polishing materials for example, brushes, wheels, pumice, polishing buff and burs used in finishing of dental prosthesis prepared in dental laboratories can transmit different infectious agents and are possible sources of cross contamination for dental laboratory technicians, dentists and for patients.2
The majority of these machines and systems are based on optical inspection technology to detect contamination on the pellet.
The optical technologies used today are limited to inspect contamination which is on the pellets.
There are three potential sources of common contamination: cross contamination, microbial contamination and biologic contamination of the process facility.
Q: What is cross contamination and what are the potential risks?
Therefore, it's in our best interests to know the condition of our ranges and to respond when contamination threatens to spread."
The EITF concluded that the costs of cleaning up environmental contamination on a company's own property should be treated as an expense.
Finally, the EITF concluded that costs incurred to mitigate or prevent environmental contamination that has yet to occur (or that may result from future operations or activities) should be capitalized because they create an asset enhancing future operations by preventing pollution that would result from future operations.
The Auburn contamination incident caught the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission and New York state hazardous materials monitoring and safety agencies by surprise.