contact with reality

con·tact with re·al·i·ty

correctly interpreting external phenomena in relation to the norms of one's social or cultural milieu.

con·tact with re·al·i·ty

(kon'takt rē-al'i-tē)
Correctly interpreting external phenomena in relation to the norms of one's social or cultural milieu.
References in classic literature ?
Now, as always, interference made him angry, and he felt sorrowfully at once how mistaken had been his supposition that his spiritual condition could immediately change him in contact with reality.
Now and then a boat from the shore gave one a momentary contact with reality. It was paddled by black fellows.
Some features of hubris syndrome, Owen points out, are, 'manifest contempt for others, loss of contact with reality, restless or reckless actions, and displays of incompetence.' Sounds familiar?
Mental effects include loss of contact with reality, an intense feeling of happiness, or agitation.
For a country that has produced decades of triumphalist Bollywood movies, it's not surprising that its own reality indeed the conduct of its very head of state has become its finest production yet.That this cycle of death perpetuates to this day, without relent, merits deeper self-reflection on part of all concerned parties, but most significantly Indian leadershipBut the world is not a Bollywood set, and India's misleading branding of its own grandeur and greatness will struggle mightily to survive any contact with reality.
Taber's Medical Dictionary defines psychosis as "a term formerly applied to any mental disorder, but now generally restricted to those disturbances of such magnitude that there is personality disintegration and loss of contact with reality." Let's think about that.
"Dementia patients also display similar clinical behaviour, when under the effect of drugs that impair contact with reality.
When this theory came into contact with reality, the result was sobering.
No plan survives contact with reality. Continually review your progress and always be open to change.
Individuals who score higher on the Es are described as having greater vitality, tolerance of unpleasant emotions, self-direction, and contact with reality (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989).
A bottle of Prednisone was also found in Cornell's bathroom the night he died and is known for side effects which can include extreme changes in mood, confusion, depression, and loss of contact with reality. However, while Cornell allegedly kept it on hand for emergencies, in case he got laryngitis and was unable to sing, his wife says that he was never tested for it, which she believes is one of the inconsistencies.