transmission

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Related to contact transmission: horizontal transmission, Disease transmission

transmission

 [trans-mish´un]
1. a passage or transfer, as of a disease from one individual to another, or of neural impulses from one neuron to another.
2. the communication of inheritable qualities from parent to offspring.
horizontal transmission the spread of an infectious agent from one individual to another, usually through contact with bodily excretions or fluids, such as sputum or blood, that contain the agent.
vertical transmission transmission from one generation to another. The term is restricted by some to genetic transmission and extended by others to include also transmission of infection from one generation to the next, as by milk or through the placenta.

trans·mis·sion

(trans-mish'ŭn),
1. Synonym(s): transfer
2. The conveyance of disease from one person to another.
3. The passage of a nerve impulse across an anatomic cleft, as in autonomic or central nervous system synapses and at neuromuscular junctions, by activation of a specific chemical mediator that stimulates or inhibits the structure across the synapse.
4. In general, passage of energy through a material.
[L. transmissio, a sending across]

transmission

Infectious disease The process by which a pathogen passes from a source of infection to a new host Major types Horizontal transmission, which constitutes the majority, and consists of the spread from one person to another by direct contact, aerosol, fecal contamination, etc, and vertical transmission–mother to infant in the birth canal. See Aerosol transmission, Cyclopropagative transmission, Direct transmission, Droplet spread transmission, Hemo-oral transmission, Hereditary transmission, Horizontal transmission, Indirect transmission, Line-of-sight transmission, Maternal-infant transmission, Nondirect transmission, Reverse transmission, Vehicle-borne transmission, Vertical transmission.

trans·mis·sion

(trans-mish'ŭn)
1. Synonym(s): transfer.
2. The conveyance of disease from one person to another.
3. The passage of a nerve impulse across an anatomic cleft, as in autonomic or central nervous system synapses and at neuromuscular junctions, by activation of a specific chemical mediator that stimulates or inhibits the structure across the synapse.
4. In general, passage of energy through a material.
[L. transmissio, a sending across]

transmission 

Passage of radiations through a medium or a substance. Transmission can be either diffuse (light is scattered in all directions) or regular (i.e. without diffusion). See absorption; translucent; transmittance; transparent.

trans·mis·sion

(trans-mish'ŭn)
1. Conveyance of disease from one person to another.
2. Passage of a nerve impulse across an anatomic cleft.
[L. transmissio, a sending across]

Patient discussion about transmission

Q. How flu is passing? I have too small children, and in the class of the older one there’s an outbreak of flu with many sick children. The last time my little son had the flu was like a hell for him, and I really won’t to prevent it. What can I do?

A. The virus (the creature that cause flu is spread in secretions from the nose, mouth etc, and children may be infective even days before they actually have visible disease.
However, simple measures, such as covering the nose and mouth while sneezing or coughing and washing hands thoroughly may minimize the transmission of the flu from child to child.

Q. Do I have hepatitis? I'm volunteering in a shelter for homeless people, and there are many drug addicts there. Yesterday, as I was serving them food one of the residents of the shelter (who I know to be a long term drug addict that uses heroine) coughed and expelled blood on my bare hands (apparently he had some lung disease). Do I now have hepatitis? I know that it's very common among drug addicts, and that it's transmitted through blood contact. I checked my hands and I didn't have any wounds or scratches, but I heard the virus can infect you even if you don't have any wound, is that right?

A. The chances of you getting hep c are very slim to none but my ? to you is why were you not wearing gloves to serve food ?

More discussions about transmission
References in periodicals archive ?
First, although contact transmission of pathogenic bacteria is well documented in hospitals, similar transmission has not been well documented in hemodialysis centers.
All remaining inoculated birds and the 1 contact transmission control were clinically normal throughout the trial.
One additional case of contact transmission from the primary vaccinee and 2 cases of tertiary transmission were confirmed.
Infection with swine influenza viruses in turkeys has been frequently reported, and experimental intranasal inoculation studies using 5 such viruses have produced infection and disease with associated contact transmission to uninfected turkeys (3,4,6).
Editorial Note: This report highlights the importance of proper vaccination site care in preventing contact transmission of vaccinia virus and the need for vacinees and unvaccinated persons who have contact with vaccinees to protect against contact transmission (2).
Crow-to-crow transmission of WNV is supported by laboratory findings of fecal-shed WNV and contact transmission (11,13) and by WNV-positive results from oral and cloacal swabs used in VecTest and RAMP (3,4).
When vaccination follow-up is completed (usually 21-28 days after vaccination), vaccination-site--care monitors should ensure that information about adverse events that require hospitalization or outpatient care, contraindications identified after vaccination, and contact transmission are documented for all vaccinees.
Experimental study of Marburg virus contact transmission. Vopr Virusol 1991; 36:506--8.
A contact transmission proportion of 8.5% (8 persons of the 94 participants had contaminated hands) is high, when one considers the insensitivity of the measure (gross fluorescence) and the number of persons possibly exposed at a county fairs.
Since 1980, several occurrences of contact transmission of vaccinia from recently vaccinated military recruits have been reported, including six cases transmitted by a single vaccine recipient [37-39].
Further studies will need to examine the viability of vaccinia virus in the environment to evaluate the possibility of contact transmission.
Evidence from wild primates and humans shows that pathogens with direct contact transmission are associated with high host specificity (1,3).