contact inhibition


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inhibition

 [in″hĭ-bish´un]
1. arrest or restraint of a process.
2. in psychoanalysis, the conscious or unconscious restraining of an impulse or desire. adj., adj inhib´itory.
competitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by an inhibitor (a substrate analogue) that competes with the substrate for binding sites on the enzymes.
contact inhibition inhibition of cell division and cell motility in normal animal cells when in close contact with each other.
noncompetitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by substances that combine with the enzyme at a site other than that utilized by the substrate.

con·tact in·hi·bi·tion

cessation of replication of dividing cells that come into contact, as in the center of a healing wound.

contact inhibition

n.
The cessation of cellular growth and division due to physical contact with other cells.

con·tact in·hi·bi·tion

(kon'takt in'hi-bish'ŭn)
Cessation of replication of dividing cells that come into contact, as in the center of a healing wound.

contact inhibition

The control or cessation of cell growth and reproduction due to contact with adjacent cells. This important restraint is lost in cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metastatic properties such as contact inhibition, intercellular adhesion, and invasiveness were examined in vitro.
DNA synthesis in the cells grown in the presence of 1 [micro]g/ml and 5 [micro]g/ml of carvacrol seems to be normal for both growth and differentiation medium since it is known that CO25 myoblasts cease proliferation when they commit to differentiate after contact inhibition in the growth medium.
After further research I determined that the contact inhibition and cancer resistance in naked mole rats is due to high levels of a molecule called hyaluronan between the cells.
Such "contact inhibition" is also used by human cells to inhibit growth, but cancer bypasses this mechanism so cells keep growing, reports New Scientist.
Interestingly, Mahall and Callaway saw contact inhibition only among Ambrosia roots from different plants; when root tips from the same Ambrosia plant came in contact with each other, no inhibition occurred.