consumption coagulopathy


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Related to consumption coagulopathy: disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

coagulopathy

 [ko-ag″u-lop´ah-the]
any disorder of blood coagulation.
consumption coagulopathy disseminated intravascular coagulation.

con·sump·tion co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

a disorder in which marked reductions develop in blood concentrations of platelets with exhaustion of the coagulation factors in the peripheral blood; often used as a synonym for disseminated intravascular coagulation (q.v.).
See also: fibrinogen-fibrin conversion syndrome.

consumption coagulopathy

consumption coagulopathy

Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy Hematology A condition characterized by ↑ platelet consumption with coagulation factor depletion–prolonged PT, PTT, ↑ fibrinolysis–generation of fibrin split products Etiology Sepsis, extensive burns, trauma, retained dead fetus, heat stroke, mismatched blood transfusion, metastatic CA, some forms of leukemia Clinical Severe bleeding, bruising

con·sump·tion co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

(kŏn-sŭmp'shŭn kō-ag'yū-lop'ă-thē)
A disorder in which marked reductions develop in blood concentrations of platelets with exhaustion of the coagulation factors in the peripheral blood as a result of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

con·sump·tion co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

(kŏn-sŭmp'shŭn kō-ag'yū-lop'ă-thē)
A disorder in which marked reductions develop in blood concentrations of platelets with exhaustion of the coagulation factors in the peripheral blood due to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

coagulopathy

any disorder of blood coagulation. See also hemophilia.

consumption coagulopathy
a bleeding tendency due to a reduction in clotting factors caused by their utilization. See also disseminated intravascular coagulation.
disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC)
see disseminated intravascular coagulation.
hepatic coagulopathy
impaired synthesis of most clotting factors, including factors I, II, V, VII, IX and X, as well as other substances involved in the fibrinolytic system, in severe liver disease can cause significant abnormalities in coagulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although post-transfusion laboratory findings were not reported and consumption coagulopathy did not seem to be aggravated in the authors' patient, I would like to draw attention to the complication of substrate supplementation in consumption coagulopathy cases without the taking of necessary precautions.
However, the term venom-induced consumption coagulopathy (VICC) has been introduced because it better describes the clinical features and the absence of other features of DIC.
Factor deficiencies in venom induced consumption coagulopathy resulting from Australian elapid envenomation: Australian Snakebite Project (ASP-10).