consumerism

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consumerism

a policy dedicated to promoting the interests of consumers as a whole.
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38) The consumeristic ideology of postwar brought an ideal that altered all aspects of cultural and social life, including the representations of motherhood and womanhood.
Men are generally more consumeristic than women, although women engage in impulse buying more than men do.
Such is the fate of the Femen group, portrayed as ideologically confused and caught in a trap of their own making, where adherence to consumeristic norms of beauty melds with a needless yearning for martyrdom.
Moreover, new consumption practices of the Thaw turned culture into an object of consumeristic experimentation (particularly with cultural items signifying "the West") by young members of the intelligentsia and a basis for new distinctions.
Francis, he says, encourages us to move beyond this shortsighted consumeristic society and develop a sense of intergenerational solidarity, to consider in what state we want to leave the planet.
Such examples of personalized benefits underscore the importance of providing employees with coverage they might otherwise not have access to and a forum for more consumeristic behavior in selecting benefits.
There is a general misconception that the society is materialistic and consumeristic but I realised that if you open a space for people to be kind and generous, they would respond in unimaginable ways.
And it is all hugely uninteresting, despite Johnston's point about the waste we generate in our consumeristic frenzies.
However, the hinge of Rittenhouse's argument occurs in Chapter 5, where he cites Tim Kasser's work in psychology (from 2004), which demonstrates that people "primed with thoughts of death, guilt, or meaninglessness are more likely to display consumeristic values and desires" (147).
He attempts to redraw the boundaries of consumer culture studies by moving beyond what he calls the "global dictatorship of capitalism" (91) and instead suggests that consumeristic spaces, such as malls, house "imagination, subjectivity, and defiance" rather than the illusions created by material desires (91).
People are getting more and more materialistic and more consumeristic.
In other words, if the conceptions of civic and citizen that inform service-learning pedagogy are aligned with neoliberal ideology, then achieving outcomes of increased civic engagement may itself be destructive to democratic and justice aims at odds with an individualistic and consumeristic, market-based logic.
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