consumerism

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consumerism

a policy dedicated to promoting the interests of consumers as a whole.
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The consolation of possession is soon complemented by the other half of the consumeristic equation, the pleasures of self-display, as Helga's relatives prepare her for an active social life: "She was incited to make an impression, a voluptuous impression.
I imagine that the writer, with this tree-hugging, latte-loving, do-gooding, myopic, suburban pseudo-middle class, childish viewpoint, believes that a consumeristic surge of buying new products is the solution for pollution.
Where else do you see this consumeristic influence on parents?
This consumeristic and acquisitive culture did not just appear from nowhere.
Table 3 shows that the preventive behaviors, the disease-specific self-management behaviors, and the consumeristic behaviors are all strongly linked with activation scores using the 13-item PAM and that there is little difference in these relationships regardless of whether the short or the long form of PAM is used.
It can be changed" (90), Gorringe spurs Christians to throw off the consumeristic mentality that is bred by modern corporations (powers) and consider whom they will serve.
Amitai Etzioni is one of many who argue that "parents who have satisfied their elementary economic needs [should] invest themselves in their children by spending less time on their careers and consumeristic pursuits and more time with their youngsters.
These actions make the organization subject to considerable regulatory and consumeristic scrutiny.
In addition, those with higher activation are significantly more likely to engage in consumeristic health behaviors, such as finding out about a new provider's qualifications.
Heedless of Gramsci, Luperini and Cataldi take a line similar to Spinazzola's regarding popular literature, which is dismissed as merely consumeristic.
Its materialistic, consumeristic core is hard to defend in an era as enlightened as ours.
Whether there are higher expectations of patient participation among younger generations, hence, a lower mean rating, and whether younger physicians are becoming more participatory in the process of adapting to the new consumeristic environment warrant further empirical investigation.
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