consumerism

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consumerism

a policy dedicated to promoting the interests of consumers as a whole.
References in periodicals archive ?
Churches, too, in their own consumerist ways have offered a profusion of activities to young people, he said, so that in church, "they don't find God.
Realistically, voluntary simplicity is unlikely to gain ground rapidly against the onslaught of consumerist values.
com/2017/03/08/directvs-regional-sports-fees-make-no-sense-you-may-be-paying-87year-more-than-your-neighbor/) brought to the attention of the Consumerist when a DirecTV customer contacted them when she noticed a sudden increase on her monthly bill related to the regional sports fee.
The Consumerist website stated: "Not only do these stickers appear to not have any sort of technology that would prevent the scanners from seeing your bits, the full-body scanners only show the general outline of your body anyway.
and Isla Fisher plays a young woman with out of control spending habits in the consumerist comedy CONFESSIONS OF A SHOPAHOLIC.
Hector Castillo Berthier, director of a Mexico City youth culture center, insists that emos don't qualify as an urban tribe because they're too consumerist and lack a social or political philosophy.
At the heart of the current debate is the consumerist fast food culture of primary care service delivery, proposed by the Government, versus the long-term doctor-patient relationship represented by smaller community-based practices such as Grange Hill.
Mesmerised by our consumerist culture, its deceit chivvies us into the futile pursuit of the "ideal" lifestyle.
4 ACADEMICS claiming that girls are torturing their Barbie dolls as a symbol of rejecting a consumerist society.
Feminist, postmodern, and cultural studies theorists have long argued that from the beginning of modern capitalist, consumerist cultures in the late nineteenth century, women have been spectacles of objectified desire.
To describe his impatience with the trendy, consumerist way of life, I set the ballet in our time's Vanity Fair--a department store, the place where my Petrushka fights to defend the real values of life: love, beauty, freedom.
Speaking in London at the Royal Society of Arts last month, Rem Koolhaas gave an excoriating analysis of the condition of architects in a consumerist global economy, citing his own description of it as a 'poisonous mixture of megalomania and impotence'.
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