consumer

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Related to consume: consomme

consumer

A generic term for a patient and potential patient, carer, organisation representing consumers’ interests, or member of the public, who is the target of health promotion programmes, and any group asking for research because they believe they have been exposed to potentially harmful circumstances, products or services.

consumer

any organism which consumes other organisms to gain food resources. Macro consumers (phagotrophs) are chiefly animals which ingest other organisms or particulate organic matter (detritus). Microconsumers are chiefly bacteria and fungi which break down dead organic material, absorb some of the decomposition products, and release inorganic nutrients (which are then re-available to the PRODUCERS) and organic materials which may provide energy sources to other organisms. See TROPHIC LEVEL.

consumer,

n one who may receive or is receiving dental service; the term is also used in health care legislation and programs as a reference to someone who is never a practitioner or is not associated in any direct or indirect way with the supplying or provision of dental services.

Patient discussion about consumer

Q. Which food should be consumed and which should be avoided. Found some months before that my mother has very painful gout. Which food should be consumed and which should be avoided and why?

A. Changing the nutrition profile will be of help and a good medical treatment for gout is also available. High protein food should be avoided. But lamb, pork, bacon, chicken, all fish, peas, beans and lentils can be taken in small amount, as protein is an important requirement for nutritional fulfillment, its intake should be in very small amounts. Alcohol should be reduced greatly, especially wine and beer. A good fluid intake of plain water is advised. Foods that aggravate shall be avoided.

Q. If an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe? Hi! While reading through the medical journal, I came to know that if an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe?

A. Approximately 30%–50% of alcoholics have low zinc status because ethanol consumption decreases intestinal absorption of zinc and increases urinary zinc -

excretion-http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16099027?dopt=Abstract

zinc is a necessary mineral you need for the immune system, brain function and other systems of the body.

Q. If an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe? Hi! While reading through the medical journal, I came to know that if an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe?

A. I am glad that you are regularly updating the medical journals. Consumption of zinc is a safe and effective means of affording protection from alcohol induced tissue injury. Zinc deficiency is an underlying feature of alcohol abuse.

More discussions about consumer
References in classic literature ?
We found that labor could buy back with its wages only so much of the product, and that capital did not consume all of the remainder of the product.
No, labor consumes all of the total product that its wages will buy back.
went to buy drugs to consume and then they were to get ready to go clubbing.
with hashish to consume and consuming hashish and amphetamines himself.
Smart money is on milk: Nations that consume a lot of milk and milk products also tend to have a lot of Nobel laureates among their populations, according to recent research.
One group was allowed to consume the diets freely whereas the other groups were only allowed to eat either the fat or sugar during their inactive period, according to an Amsterdam statement.
These lamps consume 90 percent less power than a standard incandescent lamp and 50 percent less than a CFL.
OK, so by now, most of us are trying to consume less.
On a daily basis, you have to burn more than you consume.
Such support for companies that process and consume recyclables may be most appreciated by private sector businesses in China, who have demonstrated their ability to consume secondary commodities.
Americans now consume an average of 61 pounds a year of high fructose corn syrup (especially in sodas), and we scarf down 20 teaspoons of added sugar a day (not including lactose or fructose naturally found in milk and fruit).
The public health implications of these findings may be substantial, since aspartame is used in about 6,000 products, and more than 200 million people regularly consume aspartame through foods, beverages, drugs (such as chewable vitamins), and hygiene products (such as toothpaste).