constructivism

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constructivism

in the philosophy of science, the doctrine that people actively construct their reality on the basis of their beliefs and expectations. Also known as constructionism. constructivist a person who espouses constructivism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Along these lines, the essential guideline of the constructivist approach is that pupils themselves develop their own particular comprehension by means of playing a dynamic part in building new information and their earlier learning is commanding in the development process [5].
Pedagogy in counselor education has been increasingly guided by constructivist principles of learning in recent years (Barrio Minton, Wachter Morris, & Yaites, 2014), mirroring a similar trend in education despite growing concern about its effectiveness (Kirschner, Sweller, & Clark, 2005; for a review of the debate on constructivist pedagogies in the field of general education, see Tobias & Duffy, 2009).
Finally, it has been a difficult few years for the constructivist community when it comes to the passing of important colleagues.
Classroom teachers are facing more hardships in implementing constructivists teaching or instruction.
This is a worthwhile project and from the examples he presents, he has developed a sound integrative system of working, but in my opinion, it is more suited to narrative and constructivist therapists who want to work more integratively rather than existential therapists who want to integrate narrative therapy, as the existential elements are already present in narrative therapy.
The aim of this paper is to describe the Constructivist Grounded Theory approach as described by Charmaz (2006) which was used as part of a PhD study to investigate the process of therapeutic engagement and professional boundary maintenance by mental health nurses.
Constructivist approaches to psychological theory and counseling may be considered constructive or constructivistic in the sense that both stress the ongoing processes of psychological organizing, disorganizing, and reorganizing (Mahoney, 2003).
Constructivists should reconsider their position about reality.
Savickas (1993) called for the increased development and application of constructivist approaches in career counseling to keep pace with contemporary society's movement to a postmodern perspective.
In the seventh chapter, What Human Cognitive Architecture Tells Us About Constructivism, Sweller argues that some constructivists approaches, namely discovery, problem-based, or inquiry learning, seem to imply that evolutionary secondary knowledge, such as intentional school learning, can occur as easily as evolutionary primary knowledge, such as learning to speak or listen.
Indeed, constructivists believe that what is deemed knowledge is always informed by a particular perspective and shaped by a specific ideological stance.
To this end, the works of the Constructivist artist Karl Ioganson, little known in the west, are utilized as the means of getting at the theoretical issues involved in the formation of Constructivism.