constructivism

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constructivism

in the philosophy of science, the doctrine that people actively construct their reality on the basis of their beliefs and expectations. Also known as constructionism. constructivist a person who espouses constructivism.
References in periodicals archive ?
It appears to be more attainable to use constructivist approach for the instruction of English at B.
We therefore explore how the constructivist pedagogical approach--an established and widely celebrated form of student-centered learning that is familiar to many counselor educators--may be insufficient for addressing unique training needs within the counseling profession.
Table 3 summarizes the parallel structure between the constructivist and freeschooling-learning models.
Finally, it has been a difficult few years for the constructivist community when it comes to the passing of important colleagues.
A constructivist teacher has six essential duties as noted by Collins Brown and Newman (1989):
The constructivist pedagogical beliefs, on the other hand, are characterized by child-centeredness with constructivism and social constructivism as its theoretical grounding (e.
One contributing factor may be a lack of effective modeling of constructivist methods in the teacher education program.
This is a worthwhile project and from the examples he presents, he has developed a sound integrative system of working, but in my opinion, it is more suited to narrative and constructivist therapists who want to work more integratively rather than existential therapists who want to integrate narrative therapy, as the existential elements are already present in narrative therapy.
However using a constructivist approach to research fosters reflexivity on behalf of the researcher, culminating in the co-construction of a theory that is a combination of the researcher and the participant's stories and views.
The sociomoral atmosphere that constructivist teachers speak of is a network consisting of two parts: teacher/child relations and child/child relations.
Constructivist approaches to psychological theory and counseling may be considered constructive or constructivistic in the sense that both stress the ongoing processes of psychological organizing, disorganizing, and reorganizing (Mahoney, 2003).
Constructivist approaches to education and career have been proposed as one way to work effectively with multicultural populations (Atwater, 1996; Constantine & Erickson, 1998; Stead, 2004).