constrictive pericarditis


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con·stric·tive per·i·car·di·tis

postinflammatory thickening and scarring of the membrane producing constriction of the cardiac chambers; may be acute, subacute, or chronic. Formerly called chronic constrictive pericarditis.

constrictive pericarditis

n.
Fibrous thickening of the pericardium that restricts diastolic filling of the heart, often resulting from infection, surgery, or radiation.

constrictive pericarditis

Cardiology A condition characterized by a chronic inflammation, fibrosis and scarring of a pericardium contracted to the point of compromising normal diastolic filling of the ventricles Etiology Infection, connective tissue disease, malignancy, trauma, metabolic disorders–eg uremia, RT, sarcoidosis, asbestosis, previous MI, TB, viral infection, cardiac surgery Clinical Right-sided CHF, ↓ cardiac output Complications Cardiac tamponade, pulmonary edema Management Surgical incision. See Pericardium.

con·stric·tive per·i·car·di·tis

(kŏn-strik'tiv per'i-kahr-dī'tis)
Postinflammatory thickening and scarring of the membrane producing constriction of the cardiac chambers; may be acute, subacute, or chronic. Formerly called chronic constrictive pericarditis.

constrictive pericarditis

Inflammation and thickening by fibrous tissue of the outer covering of the heart (pericardium) that prevents normal relaxation and filling of the heart chambers. Also known as Pick's disease (F.J. Pick, 1867–1926, German physician).
References in periodicals archive ?
Chylothorax as the first manifestation of constrictive pericarditis. Am J Med 2003;114:772-3.
Constrictive pericarditis, still a diagnostic challenge: comprehensive review of clinical management.
In constrictive pericarditis, chest X-ray shows a normal-sized heart, despite the clinical signs of congestive heart failure.
Traditionally, increased pericardial thickness has been considered a specific diagnostic feature of constrictive pericarditis, but these days there is also a subset of patients with hemodynamic signs of constrictive pericarditis and normal thickness of the pericardium [3].
In Case 1, pericardial involvement in the acute stage of Q fever likely progressed to chronic constrictive pericarditis because diagnosis and appropriate treatment were delayed.
Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy: the case for high-resolution dynamic tomographic imaging.
Gastro-intestinal protein loss in patients with heart failure has mainly been found in association with constrictive pericarditis [4, 5].
Complications were minimal, but included postpericardiotomy syndrome, temporary right ventricular dysfunction, temporary low output failure, postoperative atrial fibrillation, complete heart block, postoperative hemorrhage, tricuspid insufficiency, and constrictive pericarditis.
In a study of 15 cases of constrictive pericarditis and 17 normal controls, diastolic venous collapse was identified in 8 of 15 cases (6).
ARCAPA may be associated with other congenital and acquired heart diseases, including aortopulmonary window, truncus arteriosus, anomalous subclavian artery, tetralogy of Fallot, constrictive pericarditis, bicuspid aortic valve, and mitral regurgitation [7, 9-15].
Echocardiography showed findings compatible with pulmonary hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, and constrictive pericarditis (Figure 4).
Rabin, "Constrictive pericarditis, pneumopericardium and aortic aneurysm due to histoplasma capsulatum," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.