constrict

(redirected from constricting)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

constrict

V.
1. To narrow or make smaller, to shrink or contract.
2. To squeeze or compress.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous methods have been described in the literature for the removal of penile constricting devices.
The adult population frequently reports erotic or autoerotic goals when intentionally placing constricting devices [7].
Numerous techniques have been described in the literature; however there exists no universal technique given the varied nature of the constricting devices and individual presentations.
* Apply a lightly constricting band on the heart side of the wound.
He and his fellow investigators made an animal model of heart failure by surgically constricting the main artery leading out of a mouse's heart.
We look at which industry sectors are currently expanding, which are constricting and which are staying in place.
They work on serotonin receptors in the membranes covering the brain, constricting blood vessels to prevent the sensation of pain.
Given the demands on colleges and universities today--including constricting budgets and dwindling funds--reducing student has become more important than ever, says Roger Thompson, assistant vice president for enrollment at the University of Alabama (UA).
Among them are certain bras (constricting circulation), lack of proper exercise, low self-esteem (breasts are to a certain point associated with will power and the "I am"-ness of a woman), post-lactation congestion, small intestine problems, fear due to external stressors, and general mental overload that creates fear.
Austin writes, "The gender roles may have been constricting and the shoes were impossibly tight across the toes, but it's impossible to deny the now-guilty pleasures [of 1950s courtship rituals] ..." But what was on TV then?
He could teach this quite plausibly because he taught that the true human being is the soul, that the body is a prison, a tomb, a punishment for evil, and that thus in the next life the soul was freed from its constricting body.
Saying that the Independent Sector is not "taking up the cause of any particular organization", Peter Shiras, interim president and chief executive officer of the Independent Sector, said his organization became involved in the case because it believes consumers are adequately protected by existing laws and that constricting solicitors' ability to raise money violates their free speech rights.