constrict


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Related to constrict: prodigy

constrict

V.
1. To narrow or make smaller, to shrink or contract.
2. To squeeze or compress.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a concern that some of these reforms may constrict lending to infrastructure," Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Assistant Governor Johnny Noe Ravalo said in an interview.
CHILDHOOD reflex neurovascular dystrophy (RND) is a painful disease that constricts the veins and reduces the supply of oxygen to the skin, muscles and bones.
He added: "Understanding how amines are formed and how they act to constrict blood vessels will be the next steps in devising strategies to prevent laminitis.
The spasm causes the airways to constrict and leads to inflammation in the tissue that lines the airways.
SQUEEZING yourself into a bikini could seriously constrict your brain power, say psychologists.
Irritation causes the intestines to constrict which forces the stool out.
The thermal energy that is applied to the airway through this procedure reduces the amount of muscle in the airway walls which reduces the ability for it to constrict.
The sprinkler line is galvanized pipe, at least 40 years old, and has begun to constrict from rust and mineral buildup.
Normally, ACE converts the compound angiotensin I into angiotensin II, which induces the blood vessels to constrict and blood pressure to rise.
The formation of the new investment pool is the kind of move that could help preserve the REIT's share price if other institutional investors constrict their allocation of capital into the sector, a phenomenon that REIT naysayers have long been predicting, despite the sector's recent track record of strong returns.
When reproductive organs shift (or the prostate swells), this can constrict normal flow of blood, lymph, and nerve connections.
Samuelson reproduced some of the most candid admissions by congressional campaign "reformers" that they were seeking to constrict political speech: