constitutional

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constitutional

 [kon″stĭ-too´shun-al]
1. pertaining to the constitution.
2. affecting the whole constitution of the body; not local.
constitutional disease one involving a system of organs or one with widespread symptoms.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·sti·tu·tion·al

(kon'sti-tū'shŭn-ăl),
1. Relating to a body's constitution.
2. General; relating to the system as a whole; not local.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

con·sti·tu·tion·al

(kon'sti-tū'shŭn-ăl)
1. Relating to a body's constitution.
2. General; relating to the system as a whole; not local.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about constitutional

Q. What really constitutes ADD? Don't all kids have short attention spans because they are curious? What I'm saying is. I'm a very curious fellow, so, therefore, I cannot hold my attention to one thing for more than a minute. Does this mean I have ADD?

A. to what you said about how come they didn't have all these problems lots of years ago, I'll have to say it is true the kids today have a lot more stimulations than what kids had a 100 years ago, though, these problems- ADD and ADHD did exist, even with less things around to lose focus to. even about 20 years ago, when the awareness was too small, teachers just called these kids "stupid" or slow, cause they wern't able to listen for a long period of time and then did'nt know what to answer when asked. the awareness helped save lots of very smart focusless kids...

More discussions about constitutional
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the first conflict of 2009 between the judicial authority, on the one hand, and the Romanian Parliament and Government on the other disputed the supposed violation of the following Constitutional provisions: art.
Finally, a similar situation occurred in 2010, when two juridical conflicts of a constitutional nature between public authorities shared the same articles of the Fundamental Law in their dispute--that between the Parliament and the Government on the bill of the national education--respectively art.
Therefore, after an overview of the constitutional provisions which were violated in the juridical conflicts of a constitutional nature between public authorities and which were brought forth to the Romanian Constitutional Court, as well as of the parties involved in these conflicts, it appears that most of them occurred between the President and the Parliament (3), followed closely by the conflicts between the President and the judicial authority (2) and those between the Government and the judicial authority (2).
Furthermore, when analyzing the actual constitutional provisions disputed between these public authorities, I found that most of them were centered on the fourth paragraph of article 1 of the Fundamental Law, which refers to the principle of separation of powers.
Moreover, the most frequently broken constitutional provisions are those regarding the Parliament's competency--or so they are perceived by the Parliament--when the President is the one breaching them and, quite paradoxically, the ones in which the judicial authority disputes its independence and competency over certain rulings with the dualistic structure of the executive branch--a total of 4 cases.
On a final note, I believe that the analysis of the constitutional prerogatives presumably broken and disputed in the juridical conflicts of a constitutional nature between public authorities are also those provisions which need a terminological improvement and thereby, the Romanian Constitutional Court is the only authority competent to carry out such clarifications.
Before proceeding with the analysis of this next variable, it is important to note that not all of the cases implying juridical conflicts of a constitutional nature which were brought to the Romanian Constitutional Court were automatically admitted as such.
On this note, from a total of 11 Decisions on juridical conflicts of a constitutional nature between public authorities, the Romanian Constitutional Court decided that 4 of them were not cases of such conflicts (55), 5 of them were indeed admitted as constitutional conflicts and reglemented accordingly, whereas 2 had a special status (56)--they were recognized as being juridical conflicts of a constitutional nature, but they were perceived to have already stopped before the Court's ruling so no legal clarifications were made in those cases.
290/15.04.2008 admitted the existence of a juridical conflict of a constitutional nature between the Public Ministry and the Parliament regarding the procedural aspects employed in the prosecution of the Cabinet members who are also Parliament members.
Secondly, after admitting the existence of a juridical conflict of a constitutional nature between the President and the judicial power, as represented by the High Court of Cassation and Justice regarding the disregard of the latter to enforce the Decision No.
461/03.07.2009, regarding the constitutional conflict between the judicial authority, as represented by the High Court of Cassation and Justice and the Parliament and Government on the other hand, the Court decided that the former "does not have the constitutional competency to establish, modify or repeal the juridical norms with legal power and neither to do the judicial review of the legislation" (57).
Moreover, another juridical conflict of a constitutional nature was acknowledged in the Court's Decision No.