criminal law

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Related to conspiracy: conspiracy theory

crim·i·nal law

(krimĭ-năl law)
Legislation dealing with crime and its punishment.

criminal law

The area of the law relating to violations of statutes that pertain to public offenses or acts committed against the public. For example, a health care provider can be prosecuted for criminal acts such as assault and battery, fraud, and abuse.
See also: law
References in periodicals archive ?
Rafaelova Snr, 59, of Strathmore Crescent, Newcastle, was found not guilty of two counts of conspiracy to traffic people into the UK but was found guilty of all other charges; two counts of conspiracy to launder money and two counts of conspiracy to carry out forced/compulsory labour.
Conspiracy theories are not new to American politics.
Mateusz Frausenkiewicz, 31, of Buckley Road, Leamington, pleaded guilty to two counts of conspiracy to supply crack cocaine and two counts of conspiracy to supply heroin.
He claimed that he had inside knowledge of a government conspiracy to fake the moon landings, and many conspiracy theories about the Apollo moon landings which persist to this day can be traced back to his 1976 book, We Never Went to the Moon: America's Thirty Billion Dollar Swindle.
| William Eatch, 60 and of Foxhill Road, Carlton, Nottingham, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to produce Class B (amphetamine) and possession of cannabis and was jailed for five years and 11 months.
Stuart Mason, 55, of Green Lane, Wakefield, West Yorkshire pleaded guilty to conspiracy to produce Class B (amphetamine) and was jailed for four years and 10 months.
Simpson was jailed for 11 years and six months for conspiracy to supply cocaine in April, but his sentence can only now be reported as restrictions imposed until the end of another trial have been lifted.
In reversing a conviction for conspiracy to possess and distribute cocaine, the court found the government failed to prove that the conspiracies described in the 2006 and 2016 indictments, which involved the same conduct in the same geographic areas, were distinct, and thus the prosecution under the 2016 indictment violated the double jeopardy clause.
In the 1997 movie Conspiracy Theory, starring Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts, the Mel Gibson character (Jerry) is an ardent believer in conspiracies.
A large-scale conspiracy to supply Class A drugs has been broken up by police in County Durham.