consolidation

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consolidation

 [kon-sol″ĭ-da´shun]
1. solidification; the process of becoming solidified or the condition of being solid; said especially of the lung as it fills with exudate in pneumonia.
2. the combination of parts into a whole.

con·sol·i·da·tion

(kon-sol'i-dā'shŭn),
Solidification into a firm dense mass; applied especially to inflammatory induration of a normally aerated lung due to the presence of cellular exudate in the pulmonary alveoli as commonly seen in pneumonia.
[L. consolido, to make thick, condense, fr. solidus, solid]

consolidation

/con·sol·i·da·tion/ (kon-sol″ĭ-da´shun) solidification; the process of becoming or the condition of being solid; said especially of the lung as it fills with exudate in pneumonia.

consolidation

[kənsol′idā′shən]
Etymology: L, consolidare, to make solid
1 the combining of separate parts into a single whole.
2 a state of solidification.
3 (in medicine) the process of becoming solid, as when the lungs become firm and inelastic in pneumonia.

consolidation

Imaging An ↑ in radiologic density of an air-filled space, due to accumulation of fluid and WBCs, as occurs in the lungs in acute pneumonia. See Hepatization.

con·sol·i·da·tion

(kŏn-sol'i-dā'shŭn)
Solidification into a firm dense mass; applied especially to inflammatory induration of a normally aerated lung due to the presence of cellular exudate in the pulmonary alveoli.
[L. consolido, to make thick, condense, fr. solidus, solid]

consolidation

1. Becoming, or having become, solid, especially in the case of lung tissue affected by LOBAR PNEUMONIA.
2. The conversion of short-term into long-term memory.

Consolidation

A condition in which lung tissue becomes firm and solid rather than elastic and air-filled because it has accumulated fluids and tissue debris.
Mentioned in: Pneumonia

consolidation

tissue solidification, forming a firm, dense mass

consolidation

solidification; the process of becoming solidified or the condition of being solid; said especially of the lung as it fills with fibrinous exudate in pneumonia.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the one hand, there's a tendency to say, "It really doesn't matter whether I consolidate it or not, because I'm still going to end up with the same amount of net assets and net income," But in terms of your financial ratios, it makes a big impact because you're grossing up the balance sheet -- you're grossing up the income statement by consolidation -- so things like your profit margins oftentimes will look worse.
You're looking at the issue of should you consolidate something.
Students will have to wait until they graduate to consolidate, and they will lose all the benefits that come with in-school consolidation.

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