consistency principle

con·sis·ten·cy prin·ci·ple

in psychology, the desire of the human being to be consistent, especially in attitudes and beliefs; theories of attitude formation and change based on the consistency principle include balance theory, which suggests that one seeks to avoid incongruity in one's various attitudes.
See also: cognitive dissonance theory.

con·sis·ten·cy prin·ci·ple

(kŏn-sis'tĕn-sē prin'si-pĕl)
psychology The desire of human beings to be consistent, especially in their attitudes and beliefs; theories of attitude formation and change based on the consistency principle include balance theory, which suggests that people seek to avoid incongruity in their various attitudes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The consistency principle requires that the format and layout of a report are similar to prior issuances of the same report and/or other reports issued by the same department.
At the same time, according to the spatial consistency principle, each pixel of the background will be randomly updated into the neighbor model.
As one frame could not contain N samples of a specific pixel, according to the spatial consistency principle of neighbor pixels, we can fill the background model for N times with its neighbor pixels.
The commitment and consistency principle presents a challenge when wooing a prospective customer or client who has been using a rival company for a long time.
Supreme Court established a consistency principle in its race-based equal protection cases.
The new consistency principle, under which discrimination against whites is subject to strict scrutiny, conflicted with the Court's established criteria for declaring a group to be a suspect or quasi-suspect class entitled to heightened scrutiny, which focused on such considerations as the history of discrimination against the group and its political powerlessness.
Evaluative consistency principle and distraction predict an interaction between consumers' PCA and the presence or absence of an absurd ad on consumers' responses.
For example, Tognazzini [28] stresses the need to be sufficiently flexible in the management of an interface standard to allow developers to deviate from the consistency principle when they have very good reasons to do so.
In many ways, it seems hard to argue that Adarand's consistency principle should not apply to sexual orientation claims.
However, I would suggest a more critical distinction in both the race and sex cases that would explain why a consistency principle was necessary in those cases but is not necessary in the context of sexual orientation.
We propose that empirical models can be evaluated according to the following four consistency principles. It is not intended that conformity with these would be judged in a true/false sense, but rather that the nature and extent of conformity with each of the principles should be documented.

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