conservation

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con·ser·va·tion

(kon'ser-vā'shŭn),
1. Preservation from loss, injury, or decay.
2. In sensorimotor theory, the mental operation by which a person retains the idea of an object after its removal in time or space.
3. Presence of a gene in two different organisms.
4. The retention of structure with a variation in the environment, genetics, or other conditions.
[L. conservatio, a preserving, keeping]

conservation

(kon?ser-va'shon) [L. conservatio, keeping, preserving]
A cognitive principle, first described by Piaget, indicating that a certain quantity remains constant despite the transformation of shape. Children develop conservation ability for number, length, liquid amount, solid amount, space, weight, and volume.

breast conservation

Breast-conserving therapy.

conservation

the preservation, protection and management of an environment which takes into account recreational and aesthetic needs, in addition to preserving as much as possible of the natural fauna and flora and allowing for the harvesting of natural resources and agriculture. This necessitates the sensible planning of what is taken from the environment in terms of the yield of plants, animals and materials, whilst at the same time maintaining as much natural habitat as possible, and thus the largest possible GENE POOL.

con·ser·va·tion

(konsĕr-vāshŭn)
1. Preservation from loss, injury, or decay.
2. Retention of structure with a variation in environment or other conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, they learn environmental education and a conservation ethic." That's important, he says, "because part of our mission is to create lifelong stewards of the environment."
Department of the Interior's AmeriCorps; the Wilderness Work Skills Program; the High School Conservation Work Crew; and the New Hampshire Conservation Corps.
By the time they get back home, their views and values about how long to run the water to get it cold or to brush their teeth have really changed - sometimes in hilarious ways." One student was so enthusiastic about water conservation that "his parents complained he was sneaking off into the bushes to pee."
The wildlands proposal arose because of the shortcomings of current conservation efforts, its creators argue.
But more and more, ecologists and others realize that true conservation entails saving not one but many species and doing so in their natural environments.
This perspective means that four goals should drive conservation, says Reed F.

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