consequentialism


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consequentialism

(kon″sĕ-kwen′shă-lizm)
The philosophical doctrine that the correctness of a choice is proven only by what that choice produces, rather than why the choice was made or what the agent intended or hoped might occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
(9.) I take this particular delineation of classical utilitarian's subclaims from Walter Sinnott-Armstrong's entry on Consequentialism in the STANFORD ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PHILOSOPHY (Edward N.
It is a fact that Malthus did not pay as much attention in the first version of the Essay as in later versions to the obligation to conform to the commands of God as disclosed in Revelation, but can this be taken as evidence that in this regard his theology had evolved, and that the voluntarist additions by Malthus in 1817 were presented as an alternative to consequentialism and as an ethical criterion that supersedes consequentialism?
He thinks our communal nature enables virtue ethics and consequentialism to become united in a way that helps answer questions about justice--including justice in war.
For example, under consequentialism, ecological values will only ever outweigh economic alternatives when crisis has already occurred and policy will only be enacted to treat this symptom of biodiversity loss.
(Originalism's frequent reliance on the language of liberal political theorist John Rawls is consistent with its welfare consequentialism.)
Consequentialism is a family of ethical theories (of which utilitarianism is the oldest) that have in common that in evaluating an act (or a rule, a character, and so forth) the consequences, or what I have called external effects, are decisive.
This view of trademark as promise offers, in my view, a much more plausible descriptive account of the courts' treatment of product quality in infringement cases than the search costs theory of consequentialism.
In dismissing consequentialism as an appropriate defense of free markets, Colombatto overlooks important work by free-market economists who provide a consequentialist ethical foundation for the market system.
Fisher argues that virtuous consequentialism deepens our appreciation of just war theory by providing a rich ethical framework to understand and apply jus ad bellum and jus in bello; to ground the principles of just cause, right intention, and noncombatant immunity; and to evaluate preemptive war and humanitarian intervention in such places as Iraq and the former Yugoslavia.
Although there are many versions of consequentialism the central other theory is unitarianism.
Fisher coins the somewhat pretentious neologism "virtuous consequentialism," an attempted hybrid of absolutism and utilitarianism, as a label for his approach to ethics.
Then he argues that these revised theories coincide with a particular form of consequentialism, which is a theory in the same broad family as utilitarianism.