consent

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Related to consenting: Consenting Adults

consent

 [kon-sent´]
in law, voluntary agreement with an action proposed by another. Consent is an act of reason; the person giving consent must be of sufficient mental capacity and be in possession of all essential information in order to give valid consent. A person who is an infant, is mentally incompetent, or is under the influence of drugs is incapable of giving consent. Consent must also be free of coercion or fraud.
informed consent consent of a patient or other recipient of services based on the principles of autonomy and privacy; this has become the requirement at the center of morally valid decision making in health care and research. Seven criteria define informed consent: (1) competence to understand and to decide, (2) voluntary decision making, (3) disclosure of material information, (4) recommendation of a plan, (5) comprehension of terms (3) and (4), (6) decision in favor of a plan, and (7) authorization of the plan. A person gives informed consent only if all of these criteria are met. If all of the criteria are met except that the person rejects the plan, that person makes an informed refusal.

In nonemergency situations, written informed consent is generally required before many medical procedures, such as surgery, including biopsies, endoscopy, and radiographic procedures involving catheterization. The physician must explain to the patient the diagnosis, the nature of the procedure, including the risks involved and the chances of success, and the alternative methods of treatment that are available. Nurses or other members of the health care team may be involved in filling out the consent form and witnessing the signature of the patient or the parent or guardian, if the patient is a minor. In medical research, the patient must be informed that the procedure is experimental and that consent can be withdrawn at any time. In addition, the person signing the consent form must be informed of the risks and benefits of the experimental procedure and of alternative treatments.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

consent

Agreement to an action based on knowledge of what the action involves and its likely consequences.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

consent

Medtalk A voluntary yielding of a person's free will to another. See Informed consent, Presumed consent.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

consent

The implicit or explicit agreement to medical or surgical treatment or physical examination. Civil rights against personal interference are retained, however, and anything done against a person's will may be deemed an assault in law.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

consent 

A voluntary approval from a person to be examined, treated or subjected to any test undertaken upon them. Consent must be obtained prior to any such intervention.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
(104) Feminist scholars argue that the power dynamic between the police officer and the consenting individual is always gendered.
In their critique of the Court's gender neutral analysis of consent, feminists only point to the gender power dynamics between the consenting individual and the police officer, neglecting the gender power dynamics between the two occupants.
As previously discussed, Supreme Court opinions assume that the relationship between the consenting occupant and the objecting occupant is irrelevant.
This Part explores the dynamic between the police officer and the consenting occupant.
(159) Accordingly, the courts should examine the will of the consenting suspect instead of how much force was used by police.
The Court assumes that neither plays a role in the power dynamics between the police officer and the consenting individual and that the consent is unaffected by race or gender.
(b) after sexual penetration he or she does not withdraw from a person who is not consenting on becoming aware that the person is not consenting or might not be consenting.
(i) awareness that the other person is not consenting;
(ii) awareness that the other person might not be consenting; or
(iii) not giving any thought to whether the other person is not consenting or might not be consenting.
(7) Now, the fault element will also be satisfied if the accused sexually penetrates the complainant without giving any thought as to whether the complainant is not, or might not be, consenting.
Presumably, the thought is that by requiring one to consider whether the other person is consenting before engaging in an act of sexual penetration, the new s 38(2) encourages one to communicate about whether consent exists.