consent


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Related to consent: age of consent

consent

 [kon-sent´]
in law, voluntary agreement with an action proposed by another. Consent is an act of reason; the person giving consent must be of sufficient mental capacity and be in possession of all essential information in order to give valid consent. A person who is an infant, is mentally incompetent, or is under the influence of drugs is incapable of giving consent. Consent must also be free of coercion or fraud.
informed consent consent of a patient or other recipient of services based on the principles of autonomy and privacy; this has become the requirement at the center of morally valid decision making in health care and research. Seven criteria define informed consent: (1) competence to understand and to decide, (2) voluntary decision making, (3) disclosure of material information, (4) recommendation of a plan, (5) comprehension of terms (3) and (4), (6) decision in favor of a plan, and (7) authorization of the plan. A person gives informed consent only if all of these criteria are met. If all of the criteria are met except that the person rejects the plan, that person makes an informed refusal.

In nonemergency situations, written informed consent is generally required before many medical procedures, such as surgery, including biopsies, endoscopy, and radiographic procedures involving catheterization. The physician must explain to the patient the diagnosis, the nature of the procedure, including the risks involved and the chances of success, and the alternative methods of treatment that are available. Nurses or other members of the health care team may be involved in filling out the consent form and witnessing the signature of the patient or the parent or guardian, if the patient is a minor. In medical research, the patient must be informed that the procedure is experimental and that consent can be withdrawn at any time. In addition, the person signing the consent form must be informed of the risks and benefits of the experimental procedure and of alternative treatments.

consent

[kənsent′]
Etymology: L, consentire, to agree
to give approval, assent, or permission. A person must be of sufficient mental capacity and of the age at which he or she is legally recognized as competent to give consent (age of consent). See also informed consent.

consent

Agreement to an action based on knowledge of what the action involves and its likely consequences.

consent

Medtalk A voluntary yielding of a person's free will to another. See Informed consent, Presumed consent.

consent

The implicit or explicit agreement to medical or surgical treatment or physical examination. Civil rights against personal interference are retained, however, and anything done against a person's will may be deemed an assault in law.

consent 

A voluntary approval from a person to be examined, treated or subjected to any test undertaken upon them. Consent must be obtained prior to any such intervention.

consent

in law, voluntary agreement with an action proposed by another, e.g. agreement to treat, to euthanatize. Consent is an act of reason so that the person consenting must be sane and of sufficient age to be capable of giving consent. Written consent is an agreement in writing.

informed consent
agreement to a proposition when the consenting person is in possession of all of the facts relevant to the decision. In the eyes of the law the consent of a client to a surgical operation, to a financial expenditure, to euthanasia carries no authority unless the client is fully informed about what is to be done and what the alternatives are. If this is not done the client is entitled to sue for damages if the outcome is unsatisfactory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ordinarily, officers cannot enter premises without a warrant unless they have consent or there is an emergency.
If doubt exists as to whether or not spousal consent is required for a valid election, such spousal consent should be provided with the S election.
The district court suppressed the evidence found during the consent search for several reasons.
In Schneckloth and Matlock, the Supreme Court established the two prerequisites for a valid consent to search.