consciousness


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Related to consciousness: levels of consciousness

consciousness

 [kon´shus-nes]
1. the state of being conscious; fully alert, aware, oriented, and responsive to the environment.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. in psychoanalysis, the conscious.
5. in Newman's conceptual model, health as expanding consciousness, the informational capacity of the human system, or its capacity for interacting with the environment; consciousness is considered to be coextensive with the universe, residing in all matter.
clouding of consciousness see clouding of consciousness.
levels of consciousness
1. an early freudian concept referring to the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious.
2. the somewhat loosely defined states of awareness of and response to stimuli, generally considered an integral component of the assessment of an individual's neurologic status. Levels of consciousness range from full consciousness (behavioral wakefulness, orientation as to time, place, and person, and a capacity to respond appropriately to stimuli) to deep coma (complete absence of response).

Consciousness depends upon close interaction between the intact cerebral hemispheres and the central gray matter of the upper brainstem. Although the hemispheres contribute most of the specific components of consciousness (memory, intellect, and learned responses to stimuli), there must be arousal or activation of the cerebral cells before they can function. For this reason, it is suggested that a detailed description of the patient's response to specific auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli will be more meaningful to those concerned with neurologic assessment than would the use of such terms as alert, drowsy, stuporous, semiconscious, or other equally subjective labels. Standardized systems, such as the glasgow coma scale, aid in objective and less ambiguous evaluation of levels of consciousness.

Examples of the kinds of stimuli that may be used to determine a patient's responsiveness as a measure of consciousness include calling him by name, producing a sharp noise, giving simple commands, gentle shaking, pinching the biceps, and application of a blood pressure cuff. Responses to stimuli should be reported in specific terms relative to how the patient responded, whether the response was appropriate, and what occurred immediately after the response.

con·scious·ness

(con'shŭs-nes),
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

(kŏn′shəs-nĭs)
n.
1. The state or condition of being conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the conscious.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

Full awareness of self and of one's environment. The conviction that it is possible to explain the sources of consciousness has spawned a small library of books purporting to do so.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
State of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]
References in periodicals archive ?
I also believe that the electronic media have removed many of the repressions that literate consciousness put into place.
With all that said, the book covers topics you would expect in a book on consciousness, such as a discussion of dualism, functionalism, and linguistic theory.
Our application is primarily intended for adult patients with disorders of consciousness, their doctors and their families, but its market could be much larger, and we will explore its possible extension to anaesthesia, sleep disorders, epilepsy, pediatric populations, professional and personal use.
This is of great importance because in the West we often muddle our use of the terms mind and consciousness and make a divide between mind and matter.
This is the most silent and peaceful level of consciousness - one's innermost Self.
After a decade in which representationalist theories of consciousness have flourished in the philosophy of mind (see Lycan), the balance has begun to tilt away from this position.
Due to its ability to concentrate on the consciousness, phenomenology would allow, to my mind, the full preservation of the religious world as an appearance of the believer's consciousness and the clarification of this world through peculiarities of consciousness, i.e., God and everything sacred, as effects of interactions of consciousness structures.
Dies hat die gedoppelte Bedeutung; erstlich, es hat sich selbst verloren, denn es findet sich als ein anderes Wesen; zweitens, es hat damit das Andere aufgehoben, denn es sieht auch nicht das Andere als Wesen, sonderen sich selbst im Anderen." (2) The sublation of the other is a crucial feature of self-consciousness, it cannot become or recognize itself without snuffing out the instance of the other consciousness, and this recognition is not only an act of relief and negation but also the way of self-consciousness to restore its self (sein selbst) as itself (sich selbst) through the identification of its self (sein selbst) with the difference of the other.
The Bloomsbury Companion to the Philosophy of Consciousness
The study of the human consciousness, mind, their nature, structure and function is generally believed to be a subject matter outside the realm of the disciplines of physics and chemistry (Taylor and Green, 2002).
Thus, on McDowell's heterodox interpretation, the struggle for recognition between two distinct individuals in which the LBD might initially appear to consist is actually an allegory for a more basic dialectical struggle between 1) the TUA and 2) the empirical consciousness of a single individual (2009: 161ff).