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conscious

 [kon´shus]
1. having awareness of oneself and of one's acts and surroundings.
2. a state of alertness or awareness characterized by response to external stimuli.
3. the part of the mind that is constantly within awareness, one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.

con·scious

(con'shŭs),
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts, and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual, as a conscious act or idea, distinguished from automatic or instinctive.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious

(kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1.
a. Characterized by or having an awareness of one's environment and one's own existence, sensations, and thoughts.
b. Mentally perceptive or alert; awake: The patient remained fully conscious after the local anesthetic was administered.
2. Capable of thought, will, or perception: the development of conscious life on the planet.
3. Subjectively known or felt: conscious remorse.
4. Intentionally conceived or done; deliberate: a conscious insult; made a conscious effort to speak more clearly.
5. Inwardly attentive or sensitive to something: As he spoke, he became increasingly conscious of his high-pitched voice.
6. Showing awareness of or preoccupation with something. Often used in combination: a cost-conscious approach to health care; a value-conscious shopper.
n.
In psychoanalysis, the component of waking awareness perceptible by a person at any given instant; consciousness.

con′scious·ly adv.

conscious

Neurology
adjective Awake, alert.

Psychiatry
noun The content of the mind or mental functioning of which one is aware.

adjective Referring or pertaining to the content of the mind or mental functioning of which one is aware; as in, a conscious decision.

conscious

adjective Neurology Awake, alert. See Conservatorship, Unconscious noun Psychiatry The content of mind or mental functioning of which one is aware.

con·scious

(kon'shŭs)
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual, as a conscious act or idea, distinguished from automatic or instinctive.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious

Awareness of one's existence, sensations, and environment. Capable of thought and perception.

con·scious

(kon'shŭs)
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts, and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual.
[L. conscius, knowing]
References in periodicals archive ?
Prior studies indicate that this so-called "expectancy wave" arises when volunteers consciously anticipate making a planned movement or receiving a conditioned reward or punishment.
It might be argued that as long as art is consciously made to be displayed and viewed, there may not be any dramatic changes in the spaces that house it.
Current theories of motivation similarly look at ways that people consciously process information to interpret the world and plan courses of action.
All projects were supported by the Millennium Commission with money derived from National Lottery profits: an unprecedented investment in the fabric, culture and society of Britain, made the more impressive because social and environmental issues had been consciously neglected by previous governments.
Several areas at the front of the brain associated with attention and mental effort exhibited activity surges as these men, but not those without schizophrenia, consciously recalled words in both trials.
The name 'Emscher Park' is very consciously chosen: when the IBA staff talk about parks, they really mean it.
Lowered skin resistance to a mild electric current-a bodily sign of anxiety-occurred in controls as they pondered choosing cards from the riskier decks, even before they were consciously aware of which decks to avoid.
The consciously chosen elements of collage--photographs or paper with wallpaper-like patterns--are carried through by the painting, intensified and disintegrated, sometimes almost destroyed, only in order to uncover spaces in yet another way.
"It appears that people can consciously produce effects that look like memory repression," Wegner contends.
Consciously connecting it to the other painting and architectural fittings in the corridor, arousing our curiosity concerning the individuals who might share its space, she is the artist turned art detective, tracking her work and the details of its new existence.
"This is the first solid evidence that infants consciously remember what they have learned," asserts Laraine McDonough, a psychologist at the University of California, San Diego.
Since all volunteers kept their eyes closed during the trials, the latter finding may signify the generation of visual images, consciously or unconsciously, in response to the music, Zatorre suggests.