conscious

(redirected from consciously)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

conscious

 [kon´shus]
1. having awareness of oneself and of one's acts and surroundings.
2. a state of alertness or awareness characterized by response to external stimuli.
3. the part of the mind that is constantly within awareness, one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.

con·scious

(con'shŭs),
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts, and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual, as a conscious act or idea, distinguished from automatic or instinctive.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious

/con·scious/ (kon´shus)
1. having awareness of one's self, acts, and surroundings.
2. a state of alertness characterized by response to external stimuli.
3. in Freud's terminology, the part of the mind that is constantly within awareness.

conscious

(kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1.
a. Characterized by or having an awareness of one's environment and one's own existence, sensations, and thoughts.
b. Mentally perceptive or alert; awake: The patient remained fully conscious after the local anesthetic was administered.
2. Capable of thought, will, or perception: the development of conscious life on the planet.
3. Subjectively known or felt: conscious remorse.
4. Intentionally conceived or done; deliberate: a conscious insult; made a conscious effort to speak more clearly.
5. Inwardly attentive or sensitive to something: As he spoke, he became increasingly conscious of his high-pitched voice.
6. Showing awareness of or preoccupation with something. Often used in combination: a cost-conscious approach to health care; a value-conscious shopper.
n.
In psychoanalysis, the component of waking awareness perceptible by a person at any given instant; consciousness.

con′scious·ly adv.

conscious

[kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, conscire, to be aware
1 adj, (in neurology) capable of responding to sensory stimuli; awake, alert; aware of one's external environment.
2 n, (in psychiatry) that part of the psyche or mental functioning in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, and other mental content are in complete awareness. Compare preconscious, unconscious.

conscious

Neurology
adjective Awake, alert.

Psychiatry
noun The content of the mind or mental functioning of which one is aware.

adjective Referring or pertaining to the content of the mind or mental functioning of which one is aware; as in, a conscious decision.

conscious

adjective Neurology Awake, alert. See Conservatorship, Unconscious noun Psychiatry The content of mind or mental functioning of which one is aware.

con·scious

(kon'shŭs)
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual, as a conscious act or idea, distinguished from automatic or instinctive.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious

Awareness of one's existence, sensations, and environment. Capable of thought and perception.

con·scious

(kon'shŭs)
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts, and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious,

adj pertaining to the state of mind in which an individual is able to breathe on his or her own and to respond to verbal commands and physical prompts.

conscious

capable of responding to sensory stimuli; awake; aware.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amnesics also mentioned previously studied but consciously forgotten words after viewing fragmented versions of the words, in which segments of each letter were omitted and the word's identity was ambiguous.
We have always conducted our relationship privately, and we hope that as we consciously uncouple and co-parent, we will be able to continue in the same manner.
According to the study, that the brain automatically responds to a face's trustworthiness before it is even consciously perceived, which might be the reason behind why we form spontaneous judgments of other people that can be largely outside awareness.
Respect is not something that has been consciously taught to my children," said the mother of two, Tara who now 26 and Atiya who is now 20.
1 : not done consciously <an involuntary whimper>
Living Consciously, Dying Gracefully: A Journey with Cancer and Beyond
Unusually, perhaps, for such a consciously blockbusting project, it draws together ancient and modern, the archaeological and the immediate, with exhibition spaces for Nuragic and contemporary art, together with a library, congress hall, offices and retail space.
Though Schiller's fascination with crime and criminals has bee previously explored at length, his views concerning punishment have received comparatively less scrutiny in the past; Crime, Aesthetics, and the Poetics of Punishment remedies the omission, exploring how Schiller consciously discredited retribution, his question of whether murder can ever be constructed to be "good", and the expression of Schillers thoughts and points of debate through his famous plays including "Maria Stuart", "Wilhelm Tell", and "The Maid of Orleans".
Reed and Jesus and Empire by Richard Horsley reveal a social-political movement that consciously and pointedly challenged the Roman system of oppression.
As far as the Catholic Church is concerned, the principal focus of her interventions in the public arena is the protection and promotion of the dignity of the person, and she is thereby consciously drawing particular attention to principles which are not negotiable.
Each apartment will have clearly defined and well-proportion rooms, plus large open spaces providing maximum flexibility to the residents--a consciously conceived blend of pre-war elegance and modern functionality," the company said.
It is only by the magic of theatre that people are more likely to observe and reflect on the corruption of this situation which consciously or sub- consciously questions and re- evaluates their own beliefs which hopefully will result in each person changing for the better.