refusal

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refusal

 [re-fu´zal]
a declining to do something or to accept something.
conscientious refusal conscientious objection.
informed refusal refusal of treatment after one has been informed about it in an effort to gain informed consent.
refusal of treatment a declining of treatment; it may be either informed refusal or not fully informed.
References in periodicals archive ?
67, 89 (2009) (arguing that "conscientious refusals result[] in only a temporary inconvenience in obtaining emergency contraception"); Elizabeth Fenton & Loren Lomasky, Dispensing with Liberty: Conscientious Refusal and the "Morning-After Pill," 30 J.
All mention of civil disobedience or conscientious refusal is absent from Political Liberalism.
As I see things, however, if conscience protections are properly balanced and adjudicated, then a pharmacist who refuses to dispense birth control or abortifacients can legitimately be granted conscientious refusal status--but only if such refusal is balanced by another pharmacist who is willing to handle these prescriptions with no interruptions in service.
Although only 12% of pharmacists work in rural communities, (97) commentators are quick to point out that in the majority of cases that received media attention, the conscientious refusal resulted in only "temporary inconvenience," with the patient able to secure the medication within the hour, or by driving less than one hour away.
In Western political thought there is a well-known distinction between civil disobedience and conscientious refusal developed by thinkers such as Rawls, Dworkin, and others.
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), The limits of conscientious refusal in reproductive medicine, AGOG Committee Opinion, 2007, No.
In November 2007, ACOG issued a new ethical statement, "The Limits of Conscientious Refusal in Reproductive Medicine.
The American Pharmacists Association "recognizes the individual pharmacist's right to exercise conscientious refusal and supports the establishment of systems to ensure patients' access to legally prescribed therapy without compromising the pharmacist's right of refusal.
This relational image shared between doctor and patient is something to which I will return in my second point, because I think that it actually bolsters my case for conscientious refusal by the doctor; however, here I claim that the doctor-patient relationship --notwithstanding the comforting and trust-filled elements fostered in the relationship--is actually one built upon the foundation of contract.
For a discussion on the issue of monopoly and its bearing on conscientious objection see Elizabeth Fenton & Loren Lomasky, Dispensing with Liberty: Conscientious Refusal and the "Morning-After Pill," 30 J.
Going forward, federal and state policymakers are certain to put forth numerous new proposals on the issue of conscientious refusal.
More direct attention should have been given to such matters as nursing autonomy and integrity, nurses' relationships with physicians, the possibility of compromise conscientious refusal, whistle-blowing, structural change, political action, and nursing strikes.