conscientious objection

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conscientious objection

 [kon″she-en´shus]
an appeal to conscience in refusing to do, or seeking exemption from, acts that threaten a person's sense of integrity. Patients as well as physicians and nurses may appeal to conscience in refusing treatment or procedures. Called also conscientious refusal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(36) In 1953, the Court explicitly stated that a claimant seeking conscientious objector status must first establish a prima facie case of entitlement to a conscientious objection exemption.
Since the Korean War, around 20,000 conscientious objectors have refused to serve in the armed forces stating their rights to freedom of thought, conscience or religion.
The act performed by conscientious objectors and described in Uri Barabash's two-part mini-series, is naturally perceived as belonging to the first category, especially when the majority of society views Israel's control of the occupied territories as beneficial.
There were 16,000 registered conscientious objectors, compared to eight million men in the armed forces.
Needless to say, conscientious objectors were not popular with the general public, so many of their camps were located in fairly remote areas.
Notwithstanding the discussion of the multitude of conscientious objector definitions above, when fleshing out the argument that homeschooling is an act of conscientious objection to conventional public education, the definition of conscientious objectors as purely connected to military conscription will be used.
"Few question the patriotism of the honest conscientious objector," he said.
It differs from others in this genre by telling the story of Lizzie, her younger brother Freddie and her dad who are on the run in wartime Britain as Lizzie's dad is a conscientious objector.
Her analysis not only deepens our understanding of the conscientious objector experience during the war, but also explores the implications of group rights in a democracy and the duties of citizenship.