congenital toxoplasmosis


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Related to congenital toxoplasmosis: Congenital rubella

con·gen·i·tal tox·o·plas·mo·sis

toxoplasmosis apparently resulting from parasites in an infected mother being transmitted in utero to the fetus, observed as three syndromes: acute: most of the organs contain foci of necrosis in association with fever, jaundice, hydrocephaly, encephalomyelitis, pneumonitis, cutaneous rash, ophthalmic lesions, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly; subacute: most of the lesions are partly healed or calcified, but those in the brain and eye seem to remain active, inasmuch as chorioretinitis is observed in more than 80% of diseased infants; and chronic: usually not recognized during the newborn period, but chorioretinitis and cerebral lesions may be detected weeks to years later.

congenital toxoplasmosis

A transplacental infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii affecting ±13 of fetuses of ♀ with acute acquired toxoplasmosis, most severe if the infection occurs in 1st trimester; children are often normal at birth, followed by blindness, mental retardation; it may affect the brain, lung, heart, eyes, liver Clinical Hydrocephalus, microcephaly, cerebral calcifications, atrophy, chorioretinitis, uveitis, vitritis, convulsions, hyperbilirubinemia, hepatomegaly Diagnosis PCR of amniotic fluid to detect 35-fold repeat of the B1 gene of T gondii Sensitivity 97%–vs 90% with conventional parasitology Lab IgM immunoassay Management Pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, leukovorin. See TORCH.

con·gen·i·tal tox·o·plas·mo·sis

(kŏn-jen'i-tăl tok'sō-plaz-mō'sis)
A disease caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which is transmitted in utero to the fetus, observed as three syndromes: 1) acute: most of the organs contain foci of necrosis in association with fever, jaundice, hydrocephaly, encephalomyelitis, pneumonitis, rash, ophthalmic lesions, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly; 2) subacute: most of these lesions are partly healed or calcified, but those in the brain and eye seem to remain active, inasmuch as chorioretinitis is observed in more than 80% of diseased infants; and 3) chronic: usually not recognized during the newborn period, but chorioretinitis and cerebral lesions may be detected weeks to years later.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congenital toxoplasmosis. Handb Clin Neurol 2013;112:1099-1101.
Prospective study of congenital toxoplasmosis screening with use of IgG avidity and multiplex nested PCR methods.
O utco me of treatme nt fo r co ng en ita I toxo plas mos is, 1981-2004: the National Collaborative ChicagoBased, Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study.
There were 6 preterm (PT) deliveries with IUGR and oligohydramnios and with no sign of congenital toxoplasmosis. There were 5 (10%) patients that ended up in miscarriages and five (10%) had intrauterine death.
High prevalence of congenital toxoplasmosis in Brazil estimated in 3 year prospective neonatal study.
Key words: Toxoplasma gondii, congenital toxoplasmosis, serology, Qassim.
The impaired pregnancy outcome in murine congenital toxoplasmosis is associated with a pro-inflammatory immune response, but not correlated with decidual inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.
In congenital toxoplasmosis, signs and symptoms in neonates and fetuses are variable.
Screening of pregnant women is sometimes undertaken proactively in countries with high frequencies of congenital toxoplasmosis, such as France [38].
A study conducted in Brazil showed that 90% of newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis had clinical signs at birth.

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