congenital scoliosis


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Related to congenital scoliosis: Idiopathic scoliosis

congenital scoliosis

Scoliosis present at birth, usually the result of defective embryonic development of the spine.
See also: scoliosis
References in periodicals archive ?
For congenital scoliosis and kyphosis caused by hemivertebra, the hemivertebral resection can directly remove the deformity and pathology, and therefore it is the most ideal method.
Royle first described hemivertebra excision in 1927, and recent studies have proven that it is a reliable and effective method in the treatment of congenital scoliosis [2-5, 15-18].
Congenital scoliosis is a lateral curvature of the spine associated with vertebral anomalies such as block vertebra, wedge vertebra, single hemivertebra, two unilateral hemivertebrae, a unilateral unsegmented bar, or a unilateral unsegmented bar with contralateral hemivertebrae at the same level.
Diagnoses included idiopathic scoliosis (N = 606), neuromuscular scoliosis (N = 20), congenital scoliosis (N = 38), syndromic scoliosis (N = 14), kyphosis (N = 58), spondylolisthesis (N = 22), hemivertebrae (N = 4), and revision (N = 160).
However, several investigators have described hereditary congenital scoliosis [16].
In humans the HES7 gene has been linked with congenital scoliosis, a spinal defect that occurs in about 1 in 1,000 live births.
While the potential for hypoxia to disrupt embryo development has been known for almost two centuries, it is the first time that gene mutations have been identified for congenital scoliosis, a condition which affects about one in 1000 newborns.
It was distinctively S-shaped in nature and possibly the worst case of congenital scoliosis I'd seen in a long time."
He was born with a range of serious health problems, including congenital scoliosis hemivertebrae, a curvature of the spine that is the result of an extra half-vertebrae.
Congenital scoliosis, or early-onset scoliosis, is a frequent reason for imaging the spine of babies and young children.
New to this edition is a chapter on congenital scoliosis. A new chapter on how to evaluate medical literature offers practical information on critical reading of literature that incorporates evidence-based medicine, outcomes assessment, and biostatistics.
Emily Wiatrek, suffering from congenital scoliosis, was in need of a rare blood type for a life-saving surgery.

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