congenital insensitivity to pain


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Related to congenital insensitivity to pain: Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis

congenital insensitivity to pain

,

CIP

A rare defect in perception of pain in which children are born with an inherited sensory and autonomic neuropathy and a markedly reduced ability to perceive painful experiences, e.g., bone and joint injuries, lacerations, and abrasions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kaufmann, "Norepinephrine deficiency with normal blood pressure control in congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis," Annals of Neurology, vol.
Kutz et al., "Anesthetic management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis: A retrospective analysis of 358 procedures performed under general anesthesia," Anesthesia & Analgesia, vol.
Congenital insensitivity to pain. A clinical, genetic and neurophysiological study of four children from the same family.
Congenital insensitivity to pain: clinical and neurophysiological study in three sisters of a Moroccan family.
Orthopedic aspects of congenital insensitivity to pain. Chir Pediatr 1985; 26:193-196.
The syndrome of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhydrosis (CIPA) can be diagnosed clinically and confirmed by genetic testing.
Severe complications in wound healing and fracture treatment in two brothers with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.
Mutations in the TRKA/NGF receptor gene in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.
Congenital Insensitivity to Pain. J Bone Joint Surg Br.
When a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis seriously injures himself/herself, injury is generally not recognized and permanent wounds occur as a result.
In patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis, oral lesions, tissue loss in the fingers, tongue and lips, wound site infection, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, finger amputations and joint abnormalities are frequently found because of self harm behavior (1).
It is known that these individuals have been misdiagnosed with congenital indifference to pain before the existence of morphological studies of the peripheral nerves (2), since the great difference between congenital insensitivity and congenital indifference to pain lies in that individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain have the described alteration in the sural nerve biopsy and individuals with congenital indifference to pain exhibit a completely normal biopsy of peripheral nerve.

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