confusion


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confusion

 [kon-fu´zhun]
disturbed orientation in regard to time, place, or person, sometimes accompanied by disordered consciousness.

con·fu·sion

(kon-fyū'zhŭn),
A mental state in which reactions to environmental stimuli are inappropriate because the person is bewildered, perplexed, or unable to orientate herself or himself.
[L. confusio, a confounding]

confusion

/con·fu·sion/ (kon-fu´zhun) disturbed orientation in regard to time, place, or person, sometimes accompanied by disordered consciousness.

confusion

(kən-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
Psychology A mental state involving impaired orientation with respect to time, place, or person.

con·fu′sion·al adj.

confusion

[kənfyo̅o̅′shən]
Etymology: L, confundere, to mingle
a mental state characterized by disorientation regarding time, place, person, or situation. It causes bewilderment, perplexity, lack of orderly thought, and inability to choose or act decisively and perform the activities of daily living. It is usually symptomatic of an organic mental disorder, but it may accompany severe emotional stress and various psychological disorders. confusional, adj.

confusion

Neurology Disorientation with respect to time, space–place, or person, which may be accompanied by disordered consciousness. See Nocturnal confusion.

con·fu·sion

(kŏn-fyū'zhŭn)
A mental state in which reactions to environmental stimuli are inappropriate because the subject is bewildered, perplexed, or disoriented.
[L. confusio, a confounding]

confusion

A state of DISORIENTATION from disturbance of memory, loss of contact with reality, HALLUCINATION or DEMENTIA. Confusion is often temporary and the result of brain disorder from toxic influences, EPILEPSY or head injury.

con·fu·sion

(kŏn-fyū'zhŭn)
A mental state in which reactions to environmental stimuli are inappropriate.
[L. confusio, a confounding]

confusion,

n a mental state characterized by disorientation regarding time, place, or person that causes bewilderment, perplexity, lack of orderly thought, and inability to act decisively or perform the activities associated with daily living.

Patient discussion about confusion

Q. I am confused. I am overweight and my age is 39. When I checked with my weight/age chart I have found myself in the normal range. But I feel bulky and my doctor says I am overweight. I don’t understand why according to the chart I am not obese but when the doctor takes my weight and finds me as an obese. I am confused.

A. Obesity is based on the persons Basal Metabolic Rate i.e. BMI calculation. This is calculated by using the data such as your present height and weight. A simple weight/age chart is not wrong but it’s not a complete calculation to indicate a person obese. BMI is important to be known as it gives an indication that the overweight may have future chances of heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNTuzExFowo&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vJNTuzExFowo_nutrition?q=nuetrition&feature=player_embedded

Q. I was confused, is he really sticking to diet? My friend is following Fixed-menu diet which I didn’t hear before. He told that he is in diet but he is taking some of the food which he likes. I was confused, is he really sticking to diet?

A. Of course, your friend may be under diet control. I will tell you what fixed menu diet means? A fixed-menu diet provides a list of all the foods you will eat. The merits of this kind of diet are that it can be easy to follow because the foods are selected for you. However the demerit of this type of diet is that you get only few varieties of food which will make the diet boring and it will be hard to follow. If you start with a fixed-menu diet, it is easy to follow.

Q. Many diagnosis confusing me! So many people say so many diagnosis for bipolar. I am confused. I want to know what is the proper diagnosis for bipolar1?

A. bipolar/depression are both mental illnesses chemical impalance in the brain--every person is biochemically unique possessing or lacking some enzymes systems which differ subtly from those of others,these systema are inherited(genetic).the only diagnosis that they give so that you can understand is;depression,a swing between two states,episodes of overactivity,elation,or irritabillity,increased appetite for food,sex,alcohol,outbust of inappropiate anger,laugther,delusions,attacks can last for montha or days.I have about 7pdrs an none of them can give you an answer that the every day person can understand.---mrfoot56

More discussions about confusion
References in periodicals archive ?
Lead researcher, Professor Emma Reynish, Chair in Dementia Studies at the University of Stirling, said, "People with confusion - or cognitive spectrum disorders - make up over one-third of the population over 65 who are admitted as an emergency to hospital, and half of patients over the age of 85 years.
Confusion is more likely where products with similar marks are distributed in the same geographic market and are in direct competition or are sold through the same marketing channels.
Following in this path, courts tend to view confusion itself as the ill that trademark law seeks to cure and to assume that the optimal level of confusion is always zero.
On appeal, the defendant again challenged the jury's verdict by arguing that proof of actual consumer confusion is required for an award of monetary damages under the Lanham Act and that because the record did not provide any evidence of actual confusion, the judgment should be reversed.
Objective: To describe the definition of confounding factors, give some examples and tools for their determination, and to suggest strategies to reduce confusion in study designs.
Signs of post-operative confusion can develop two or three days after the patient's arrival in the intensive care unit and can last for several weeks.
Although they did not understand what Jesus meant by this, in the midst of all of this confusion, we find the promise of Christ's resurrection.
However, contracting officers and prime contractors should be aware of the potential for confusion in this area.
These, too, emerge from a kind of confusion, this time between the identities of Henry Darger and Charles Dodgson.
The first confusion here is the idea that only "theology" majors cross the boundaries of church and state.
We regret any confusion these errors may have caused.
TACOM-Rock Island is going to modify the description in the next change to the TM to clear up the confusion.