conflict

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Related to confliction: preliminary, opinionated, vindication, sought

conflict

 [kon´flikt]
a mental struggle arising from the clash of incompatible or opposing impulses, wishes, drives, or external demands.
decisional conflict (specify) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state of uncertainty about the course of action to be taken when choice among competing actions involves risk, loss, or challenge to personal values.
extrapsychic conflict that between the self and the external environment.
intrapsychic conflict conflict between incompatible or opposing wishes, impulses, needs, thoughts, or demands within one's own mind.
parental role conflict a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as experience by a parent of role confusion and conflict in response to crisis. See also parenting.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·flict

(kon'flikt),
Tension or stress experienced by an organism when satisfaction of a need, drive, motive, or wish is thwarted by the presence of other attractive or unattractive needs, drives, or motives.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

conflict

(kŏn′flĭkt′)
n.
Psychology An emotional or mental disturbance resulting from the opposition or simultaneous functioning of mutually exclusive impulses, desires, or tendencies.
intr.v. (kən-flĭkt′) con·flicted, con·flicting, con·flicts
1. To be in or come into opposition; differ.
2. Archaic To engage in warfare.

con·flic′tion n.
con·flic′tive adj.
con·flic′tu·al (kən-flĭk′cho͞o-əl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

conflict

Neurology See Visual-vestibular conflict Psychiatry A mental struggle that arises from the simultaneous operation of opposing impulses, drives, external–environmental or internal demands Types Intrapsychic–between forces within the personality; extrapsychic–between the self and the environment. See Approach-avoidance conflict Vox populi
1. Collision, clash. See Feto-maternal conflict.
2. War, battle. See Man-made disaster.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·flict

(kon'flikt)
Tension or stress experienced by an organism when satisfaction of a need, drive, motive, or wish is thwarted by the presence of other attractive or unattractive needs, drives, or motives.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

conflict

The effect of the presence of two mutually incompatible wishes or emotions. Unacceptably unpleasant conflict leads to REPRESSION and this may be manifested as NEUROSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
ISSUE: Did a neighbor of Westerly State Airport have standing to challenge a town ordinance that classified his land as being in a "confliction area"?
(1995 confliction, re-vectoring exo 2D rp 1 Haskell & Wickens (1993) altitude, distance ego same rp - Haskell & Wickens (1993) closest point of approach ego same rp - Wickens et al.
These airspace conflictions are affecting payload decisions, she said, including the inclusion of air-to-air radar and video packages that could avert a collision.
He definitely does have a dark side but at the same time he hasn't been there for a while and I think that dynamic with Ali and Michelle, I think that's something that can very much trigger those inner insecurities and those conflictions that can hold him back from just letting himself be ok.
In Bahrain, the insurgency works as lieutenants for the US establishment and the latter has its domestic conflictions.
"Human and spiritual conflictions are prevalent throughout the story," Durst explained.