conflict


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Related to conflict: Conflict resolution, Conflict theory

conflict

 [kon´flikt]
a mental struggle arising from the clash of incompatible or opposing impulses, wishes, drives, or external demands.
decisional conflict (specify) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state of uncertainty about the course of action to be taken when choice among competing actions involves risk, loss, or challenge to personal values.
extrapsychic conflict that between the self and the external environment.
intrapsychic conflict conflict between incompatible or opposing wishes, impulses, needs, thoughts, or demands within one's own mind.
parental role conflict a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as experience by a parent of role confusion and conflict in response to crisis. See also parenting.

con·flict

(kon'flikt),
Tension or stress experienced by an organism when satisfaction of a need, drive, motive, or wish is thwarted by the presence of other attractive or unattractive needs, drives, or motives.

conflict

/con·flict/ (kon´flikt) a mental struggle, often unconscious, arising from the clash of incompatible or opposing impulses, wishes, drives, or external demands.
extrapsychic conflict  that between the self and the external environment.
intrapsychic conflict  that between forces within the self.

conflict

(kŏn′flĭkt′)
n.
Psychology An emotional or mental disturbance resulting from the opposition or simultaneous functioning of mutually exclusive impulses, desires, or tendencies.
intr.v. (kən-flĭkt′) con·flicted, con·flicting, con·flicts
1. To be in or come into opposition; differ.
2. Archaic To engage in warfare.

con·flic′tion n.
con·flic′tive adj.
con·flic′tu·al (kən-flĭk′cho͞o-əl) adj.

conflict

[kon′flikt]
Etymology: L, conflictere, to strike together
1 a mental struggle, either conscious or unconscious, resulting from the simultaneous presence of opposing or incompatible thoughts, ideas, goals, or emotional forces, such as impulses, desires, or drives.
2 a painful state of consciousness caused by the arousal of such opposing forces and the inability to resolve them; a kind of stress found to a certain degree in every person.
3 (in psychoanalysis) the unconscious emotional struggle between the demands of the id and those of the ego and superego or between the demands of the ego and the restrictions imposed by society. Kinds of conflict include approach-approach conflict, approach-avoidance conflict, avoidance-avoidance conflict, extrapsychic conflict, and intrapsychic conflict.

conflict

Neurology See Visual-vestibular conflict Psychiatry A mental struggle that arises from the simultaneous operation of opposing impulses, drives, external–environmental or internal demands Types Intrapsychic–between forces within the personality; extrapsychic–between the self and the environment. See Approach-avoidance conflict Vox populi
1. Collision, clash. See Feto-maternal conflict.
2. War, battle. See Man-made disaster.

con·flict

(kon'flikt)
Tension or stress experienced by an organism when satisfaction of a need, drive, motive, or wish is thwarted by the presence of other attractive or unattractive needs, drives, or motives.

conflict

The effect of the presence of two mutually incompatible wishes or emotions. Unacceptably unpleasant conflict leads to REPRESSION and this may be manifested as NEUROSIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Work-family conflict and organizational commitment: A study of faculty members in Pakistani universities Pakistan: Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.
Relation of work-family conflict to health outcomes: A four-year longitudinal study of employed parents: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.
This conflict-handling style may have to be used by a manager when there is a conflict over a company policy that is nonnegotiable.
The patient and provider could be in conflict because the provider wants the patient to go straight to the station prior to dialysis, but the patient wants to walk around the treatment area first to visit all of his fellow patients.
Properly developed conflict resolution skills enhance the leadership and administrative skills that is part of the responsibility of an administrator (Thamhain, 1992).
Researchers have identified the knowledge base and skills necessary for the development of successful administrators and conflict resolution skills is among those skills (Wilmore, 2003).
My aim in this study was to answer the following questions: (1) What is the relationship between a dominant conflict management culture and job satisfaction, holding the other cultures constant?
I examined conflict management cultures within a sample of 743 employees in bank branches in West Virginia and Washington, DC, USA.
2009) [14] in "A comparative test of work-family conflict models and critical examination of work-family linkages" indicates that "direct effects drive work-family conflict models while indirect effects provide little incremental explanation with regard to satisfaction outcomes".
While it is often viewed as a negative aspect of business, conflict is necessary and in some cases even desired.
A social conflict is a situation where two or more persons hanker after the aim or aspiration that they did not agree to share with each other.
Conflict arises due to struggle between parties when they want to get their objectives, or to do according to their own beliefs or to fulfil their own needs.