confinement

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con·fine·ment

(kon-fīn'ment),
Lying-in; giving birth to a child.
[L. confine (ntr.), a boundary, confine, fr. con- + finis, boundary]

con·fine·ment

claustrophobia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

confinement

(kən-fīn′mənt)
n.
1. The act of confining or the state of being confined.
2. Lying-in.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

confinement

Obstetrics See EDC/EDL–expected date of confinement or expected date of labor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·fine·ment

(kŏn-fīn'mĕnt)
Lying-in; giving birth to a child.
[L. confine (ntr.), a boundary, confine, fr. con- + finis, boundary]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

confinement

The period from the start of labour to the delivery of the afterbirth (placenta).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Group-I birds were reared in free-range and group-II birds in confinement rearing systems.
Behavioral observations for the birds kept under confinement and free-range rearing systems were monitored and compared.
Table II.-Comparative month vise behavioral time-budget for turkeys in confinement and free range rearing systems.
gallopavo raised under free-range and confinement rearing systems.
During 4th month of present study, turkeys spent 9.85% time for aggressiveness behavior in confinement which is higher than time 8.27% spent for aggressiveness activities of turkeys in free range rearing system (Table II).
In confinement rearing system, average time spent in feather pecking was recorded 7.98% while time budget for feather pecking was 6.23% for the birds reared under free-range rearing system (Table III).
Table III.-Time budgets (%) of Maleagris gallopavo in free range and confinement rearing systems.
Confinement workers also exhibit decreased pulmonary function indicative of both chronic and acute effects (Boyer, 1974; Thelin, 1984; Stahuliak-Berinc, 1977; Brouwer, 1986; Holness, 1987; Donham, 1989; Reynolds, 1993; Donham, 1984; Muller, 1986; Petro, 1978)."
Now, from the OSHA studies on hydrogen sulfide (which the Minnesota Pollution Control Association has measured at 30 times the federal limit at confinement sites):
We know that humans in the confinement industry have died from sewer gases.
So, we now know that sewer pipes and confinement systems are the same.