confidentiality


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confidentiality

 [kon-fĭ-den-she-al´ĭ-te]
a substantive rule in bioethics saying that the information a patient reveals to a health care provider is private and has limits on how and when it can be disclosed to a third party; usually the provider must obtain permission from the patient to make such a disclosure.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē),
The legally protected right afforded to (and duty required of) specifically designated health care professionals not to disclose information discerned or communicated during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality

Medspeak-UK
The non-disclosure of the private information of another. The state of data privacy, which is generally held under legal and ethical obligations of non-disclosure.

Patient privacy 
An implied agreement between a physician and a patient that all information related by the patient is to be held in the strictest of confidence, unless it is illegal and/or dangerous to society.

Psychiatry
The ethical principle that a physician may not reveal any information disclosed in the course of medical care, unless the patient who disclosed that information poses a threat to him/herself or others. Psychiatrists need a lower disclosure threshold, because they may see patients in their practice who are mentally volatile and potentially dangerous.

confidentiality

Psychiatry The ethical principle that a physician may not reveal any information disclosed in the course of medical care. See Anne Sexton, Bennett-Leahy bill, Doctor-patient relationship, Hippocratic Oath, Malpractice, Privilege, Privileged communication.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē)
The statutorily protected right and duty of health professionals not to disclose information acquired during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality

The principle which protects the right of patients to expect that details of their medical conditions should be divulged only to those who need to know them for medical purposes.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē)
The legally protected right afforded to (and duty required of) specifically designated health care professionals not to disclose information discerned or communicated during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]
References in periodicals archive ?
CBP said the new online tool will allow importers and exporters to "directly input all applicable name variations into the Vessel Manifest Confidentiality request tool."
Where there is a confidentiality provision in a settlement, the restrictions on who can be told about the settlement are typically spelled out in the agreement, Louthian said.
Brennan cooperates and proceeds with the state's investigation, she will be required to sign a contract with the state requiring her to adhere to the state's strict confidentiality directive."View the full article from NJBIZ at http://www.njbiz.com/article/20190107/NJBIZ01/190109902/brennan-sues-state-murphy-campaign-and-alleged-attacker.
Confidentiality in the UAE and the Broader Gulf Region
Under the erstwhile provisions under Central Excise and Central Sale Tax (CST) Rules there were in-built safeguards to protect confidentiality of business transactions.
When it is necessary to provide a third unauthorised person with confidential information, the recipient is obliged to secure the previous written consent of the provider and thereafter to impose upon the third person the obligation of confidentiality. If there is unauthorised, negligent or inadvertent disclosure of confidential information, the recipient undertakes to inform the provider immediately in writing.
In the first instance, the UDBHR relates human dignity and privacy/ confidentiality to each other.
In reaching this conclusion, the Upjohn Court emphasized the confidentiality of the investigation at issue: specifically, the employees participating in the Upjohn investigation were "sufficiently aware that they were being questioned in order that the corporation could obtain legal advice" and the information provided by employees in the course of the investigation in questionnaires and interviews had "been treated as confidential material and [had] not been disclosed to anyone except" in-house and outside counsel.
Before entering into the confidentiality agreement with Sanofi, Medivation received from Sanofi, and Medivation's board of directors unanimously rejected as not in the best interests of the company and its stockholders, a new unsolicited proposal to acquire Medivation.
[13] Therefore, we aimed to ascertain how healthcare students define confidentiality and in which cases, they argue, it may be breached.
Fisher presents readers with a comprehensive examination of the limits of confidentiality in a wide range of clinical and therapeutic contexts and settings.
The argument was preposterous - any deterrent effect would stem from the university's own disregard for confidentiality. The UO eventually dropped its suit and settled with the alleged victim for $800,000 plus full tuition, room and board.

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