confidentiality

(redirected from confide)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

confidentiality

 [kon-fĭ-den-she-al´ĭ-te]
a substantive rule in bioethics saying that the information a patient reveals to a health care provider is private and has limits on how and when it can be disclosed to a third party; usually the provider must obtain permission from the patient to make such a disclosure.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē),
The legally protected right afforded to (and duty required of) specifically designated health care professionals not to disclose information discerned or communicated during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality

Medspeak-UK
The non-disclosure of the private information of another. The state of data privacy, which is generally held under legal and ethical obligations of non-disclosure.

Patient privacy 
An implied agreement between a physician and a patient that all information related by the patient is to be held in the strictest of confidence, unless it is illegal and/or dangerous to society.

Psychiatry
The ethical principle that a physician may not reveal any information disclosed in the course of medical care, unless the patient who disclosed that information poses a threat to him/herself or others. Psychiatrists need a lower disclosure threshold, because they may see patients in their practice who are mentally volatile and potentially dangerous.

confidentiality

Psychiatry The ethical principle that a physician may not reveal any information disclosed in the course of medical care. See Anne Sexton, Bennett-Leahy bill, Doctor-patient relationship, Hippocratic Oath, Malpractice, Privilege, Privileged communication.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē)
The statutorily protected right and duty of health professionals not to disclose information acquired during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality

The principle which protects the right of patients to expect that details of their medical conditions should be divulged only to those who need to know them for medical purposes.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē)
The legally protected right afforded to (and duty required of) specifically designated health care professionals not to disclose information discerned or communicated during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]
References in periodicals archive ?
Users can now use the new ScreenShield technology by (https://getconfide.com/ios) downloading the latest version of the Confide app.
Selon cet informaticien a l'universite de Californie, a Berkeley, la conformite de Confide reste encore a prouver.
President Donald Trump's administration (https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/upheaval-is-now-standard-operating-procedure-inside-the-white-house/2017/02/13/d65dee58-f213-11e6-a9b0-ecee7ce475fc_story.html?utm_term=.4c638cbc5f53) reportedly is using Confide to curb leaks to the press.
Coleen says: SHE'S inviting you to confide in her and that should make it easier.
On Friday, a dejected Michelle confides in Liz just how bad things have got with Steve.
And one in 20 said they confide in work mates 'very frequently' about personal matters and 30 percent said that they regard the majority of their colleagues as true friends.
They found that patients able to confide in someone close, a lover,friend or relative, were half as likely to suffer subsequent heart attacks than those on their own.
A HOW lucky your sister is to have someone like you to confide in.
Which star would you most and least like to confide in ?
According to the security researchers, it was possible for an attacker to hijack Confide by taking advantage of a number of technical flaws, including a failure to require a legitimate SSL certificate to ensure the app is communicating with a trusted server and hasn't been compromised.
If your friends have opened up to you, then it's given you the perfect opportunity to confide in them.