cone cell


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Related to cone cell: rod cell

cone cell

(kōn sel)
One of the two types of visual receptor cells of the retina, essential for visual acuity and color vision; the second type is the rod cell.

cone cell

A cell in the retina whose scleral end forms a cone that serves as a light receptor. Vision in bright light, color vision, and acute vision depend on the function of the cones. See: rod cell
See also: cell

cone cell

a cone-shaped cell sensitive to light, found throughout the retina of most vertebrate eyes but concentrated within the FOVEA (see RETINAL CONVERVENCE). Cones are concerned with discrimination of colour and with visual acuity. There are three types of cone cell, each containing a different IODOPSIN and each giving maximum response when stimulated by the blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), and red (550 nm) parts of the visible spectrum. Our perception of any given colour is produced by the relative degree to which each cone is stimulated by any given wavelength of visible light. This is in accord with the TRICHROMATIC THEORY of colour vision which suggests that all colours can be produced by the mixing of blue, green and red. Thus the brain detects a yellow light by the equal stimulation of red and green cone gells. A pigment defect in one or more of the types of cone cell can lead to COLOUR BLINDNESS.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the new study, scientists engineered mice to make more Pias3 than normal in the eye and counted rod and cone cells.
The mice in the study had genetic defects that killed off their rod and cone cells shortly after birth.
This condition results from an absence of color-sensitive pigment in the cone cells of the retina.
The major inherited color vision deficiencies caused by defective or absent cone cells are:
Experts believe it has potential to treat adult vision disorders involving cone cells - the most important human vision cells.
MD occurs when the layer of the retina responsible for nourishing the macula's light-sensitive rod and cone cells, and for carrying away waste products, starts to function less effectively as it ages.
Without the underlying carpet of RPE cells, the rod and cone cells that respond to light cannot survive
As fewer cells in the macula (a small yellowish area of the retina where cone cells are most densely packed) (13) are able to function, people see details less clearly in front of them, such as faces or words in a book.
Rod and cone cells absorb light in the retina, then release neurotransmitters (chemical signals) to neurons in the optic nerve, or bundle of neurons (nerve cells).
their eyes have many rod cells, relatively few cone cells
Unlike the other two species, Type A has crystalline cone cells in some ommatidia, particularly towards the posterior end of the eye [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 6A OMITTED].