conductivity

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conductivity

 [kon″duk-tiv´ĭ-te]
capacity for conduction.

con·duc·tiv·i·ty

(kon'dŭk-tiv'i-tē),
1. The power of transmission or conveyance of certain forms of energy, as heat, sound, and electricity, without perceptible motion in the conducting body.
2. The property, inherent in living protoplasm, of transmitting a state of excitation; for example, in muscle or nerve.

conductivity

/con·duc·tiv·i·ty/ (kon″duk-tiv´ĭ-te) the capacity of a body to transmit a flow of electricity or heat; the conductance per unit area of the body.

conductivity

(kŏn′dŭk-tĭv′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. conductivi·ties
1. The ability or power to conduct or transmit heat, electricity, or sound.
2. The conductance of a material.
3. Physiology The conductibility of a structure, especially the ability of a nerve to transmit a wave of excitation.

conductivity

the ability of an electric or other system to transmit sound, heat, light, or electromagnetic energy.

con·duc·tiv·i·ty

(kon'dŭk-tiv'i-tē)
1. The power of transmission or conveyance of certain forms of energy, such as heat, sound, and electricity, without perceptible motion in the conducting body.
2. The property, inherent in living protoplasm, of transmitting a state of excitation; e.g., in muscle or nerve.

conductivity

  1. the property of conducting an electric current.
  2. the passage of a physiological disturbance through tissue or a cell, as in a NERVE IMPULSE.

con·duc·tiv·i·ty

(kon'dŭk-tiv'i-tē)
The power of transmission or conveyance of energy, without perceptible motion in the conducting body.

conductivity,

n the capacity for conduction; ability to convey.
conductivity, electrical,
n the ability of a material to conduct electricity. Metals are usually good conductors, and nonmetals are poor conductors.
conductivity, thermal,
n the ability of a material to transfer heat. Thermal conductivity is of great importance in dentistry, where a low thermal conductivity is desirable in restorative material and a high thermal conductivity is desirable when soft tissue is covered.

conductivity

capacity for conduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 11 shows the experimental in-plane thermal conductivities of random oriented composites, [k.
7 wt% PPy, have conductivities in the same range as that of the nanocomposite samples MMT BJ modified with 13.
However, the conductivities of P3OT doped with DBSA were found to be low as compared to P3OT doped with [FeCl.
3 and 5 that the measured thermal conductivities of the composites are higher than the predictions when the filler volume fraction is more than 20%.
Note that conductivity is plotted on a logarithmic axis, to allow comparison of fluids with conductivities orders of magnitude apart.
New conductivity measurement technology provides accurate measurements over an extraordinarily wide range of values, from milli-Siemens/cm down to as low as 1 femto-Siemen/cm, allowing users to accurately follow widely varying conductivities from start to finish with a single meter.
Actually the tested concrete has several components containing different thermal conductivities such as air content, cement hydrates, coarse aggregate, sand, and FA.
The typical approach to the estimation of thermal conductivities is to carry out measurements in the laboratory on samples.
However, leaching did not affect the conductivities of the 500 [mu]S/cm, 1000 [mu]S/cm, and 100 000 [mu]S/cm solutions, which did not change significantly.
Because of this, applications designed from thermoplastics with a conductivity of 1 to 10 W/m[degrees]K may transfer as much, or even more, total heat than similar parts designed in metals with higher thermal conductivities.
Additionally, high surface area carbon blacks contribute higher conductivities (ref.