conduction

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conduction

 [kon-duk´shun]
conveyance of energy, as of heat, sound, or electricity.
aberrant ventricular conduction the temporary abnormal intraventricular conduction of supraventricular impulses; called also ventricular aberration.
aerial conduction (air conduction) conduction of sound waves to the organ of hearing in the inner ear through the air.
anterograde conduction
1. forward conduction of impulses through a nerve.
2. in the heart, conduction of impulses from atria to ventricles.
atrioventricular conduction (AV conduction) the conduction of atrial impulses through the atrioventricular node and the His-Purkinje system to the ventricles.
bone conduction conduction of sound waves to the inner ear through the bones of the skull.
concealed conduction conduction that is not seen on the surface electrocardiogram but may be detected by its effect on subsequent impulses; common examples are the incomplete penetration of the AV junction during atrial fibrillation, the Wenckebach type penetration during atrial flutter, and the retrograde incomplete penetration following ventricular ectopic beats.
decremental conduction a gradual decrease in the stimuli and response along a pathway of conduction; it occurs in nerve fibers with reduced membrane potentials.
retrograde conduction transmission of a cardiac impulse backward in the ventricular to atrial direction; particularly, conduction from the atrioventricular node into the atria.
saltatory conduction the rapid passage of an electric potential between the nodes of ranvier in myelinated nerve fibers, rather than along the full length of the membrane.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·duc·tion

(kon-dŭk'shŭn),
1. The act of transmitting or conveying certain forms of energy, such as heat, sound, or electricity, from one point to another, without evident movement in the conducting body.
2. The transmission of stimuli of various sorts by living protoplasm.
[L. con- duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

conduction

Cardiac pacing The passage of an electrical charge; the active propagation of a depolarization wave in the heart Physiology The transmission of nerve impulses. See Retrograde conduction.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·duc·tion

(kŏn-dŭk'shŭn)
1. The act of transmitting or conveying certain forms of energy, such as heat, sound, or electricity, from one point to another, without evident movement in the conducting body.
2. The transmission of stimuli of various sorts by living protoplasm.
3. The process by which a nerve impulse is transmitted.
[L. con-duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

conduction

the transmission of an electrical current by a conductor.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

con·duc·tion

(kŏn-dŭk'shŭn)
Transmitting or conveying energy, from one point to another, without evident movement in conducting body.
[L. con-duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The mechanical delay can then be determined based on the difference between the two parts, which reflects the conduction time of these two parts.
Prolonged latency of response can result from peripheral injury since there were no significant differences in central conduction time TT between the study and the control group.
Prolonged atrial conduction times have been related to both onset and recurrence of atrial fibrillation [7, 8].
Evaluation of atrial conduction time b y P wave dispersion and tissue Doppler echocardiography in prehypertensive patients.
Two simple electrocardiographic markers, P wave maximal duration and P wave dispersion, have been used to evaluate the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction times and the inhomogeneous propagation of sinus impulses which are well-known electrophysiological characteristics of atria that prone to fibrillation.2,3 P dispersion is defined as the difference between the longest and shortest P wave durations recorded from 12-lead surface electrocardiogram (ECG) leads.
The total atrial conduction time (PA-tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) duration) was assessed by measuring the time interval between the beginning of the P wave on the surface ECG and point of the peak A wave on TDI from LA lateral wall just over the mitral annulus.
Conduction time series factors (CTSF) are determined with a one-dimensional finite volume method (FVM) model.
AEx (1 g/l) prolonged (27 [+ or -] 6.5%, n = 10 trials, 5 hearts, p < 0.001) the electrical wave conduction time from the right atrium to the His bundle (A-H), before inducing a complete AV block (Fig.
This pathophysiologic alteration causes a delay in the conduction time of the impulses transmitted along the peripheral motor neuron pathways.
The woman's ABR conduction time was normal, but her otoacoustic emissions analysis detected a very intense SOAE and DPOAE in the right ear, and an intense SOAE and no DPOAE in the left.
[4] The conduction time in the proximal segment of reflex arc is calculated with the start point from the popliteal fossa (Ia afferent) and endpoint again at popliteal fossa (a motor neuron) (HRL-MRL).
Practice parameters for electrophysiological diagnostic criteria of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow:[sup][4] (1) the nerve conduction time of each segment was mean + 2 standard deviations (SDs) longer than the same segment in the healthy group; (2) conduction block was found in proximal segment compared with the successive distal segment that CMAP was reduced by 20% or more and duration was increased by 10% or less.