conduction

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Related to conduction disorder: conduction defect

conduction

 [kon-duk´shun]
conveyance of energy, as of heat, sound, or electricity.
aberrant ventricular conduction the temporary abnormal intraventricular conduction of supraventricular impulses; called also ventricular aberration.
aerial conduction (air conduction) conduction of sound waves to the organ of hearing in the inner ear through the air.
anterograde conduction
1. forward conduction of impulses through a nerve.
2. in the heart, conduction of impulses from atria to ventricles.
atrioventricular conduction (AV conduction) the conduction of atrial impulses through the atrioventricular node and the His-Purkinje system to the ventricles.
bone conduction conduction of sound waves to the inner ear through the bones of the skull.
concealed conduction conduction that is not seen on the surface electrocardiogram but may be detected by its effect on subsequent impulses; common examples are the incomplete penetration of the AV junction during atrial fibrillation, the Wenckebach type penetration during atrial flutter, and the retrograde incomplete penetration following ventricular ectopic beats.
decremental conduction a gradual decrease in the stimuli and response along a pathway of conduction; it occurs in nerve fibers with reduced membrane potentials.
retrograde conduction transmission of a cardiac impulse backward in the ventricular to atrial direction; particularly, conduction from the atrioventricular node into the atria.
saltatory conduction the rapid passage of an electric potential between the nodes of ranvier in myelinated nerve fibers, rather than along the full length of the membrane.

con·duc·tion

(kon-dŭk'shŭn),
1. The act of transmitting or conveying certain forms of energy, such as heat, sound, or electricity, from one point to another, without evident movement in the conducting body.
2. The transmission of stimuli of various sorts by living protoplasm.
[L. con- duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]

conduction

Cardiac pacing The passage of an electrical charge; the active propagation of a depolarization wave in the heart Physiology The transmission of nerve impulses. See Retrograde conduction.

con·duc·tion

(kŏn-dŭk'shŭn)
1. The act of transmitting or conveying certain forms of energy, such as heat, sound, or electricity, from one point to another, without evident movement in the conducting body.
2. The transmission of stimuli of various sorts by living protoplasm.
3. The process by which a nerve impulse is transmitted.
[L. con-duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]

conduction

the transmission of an electrical current by a conductor.

con·duc·tion

(kŏn-dŭk'shŭn)
Transmitting or conveying energy, from one point to another, without evident movement in conducting body.
[L. con-duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]
References in periodicals archive ?
All patients with chronic conduction disorder in whom no reversible cause was found and hence were candidate for permanent pacemaker implantation were subjected to coronary angiography.
In this study the prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing permanent pacemaker implantation for chronic conduction disorder was 67.9% which is well within broad range (30-70%)6 mentioned in the literature.
Objective: To find out the frequency of ischemic heart disease in patients with conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker implantation.
Cardiac evaluation with electrocardiography must be done for conduction disorders in patients using chloroquine for rheumatic diseases.
Long-term chloroquine treatment can produce cardiac toxicity, restrictive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as well as atrioventricular blocks (AVB) or other conduction disorders (3).
Ankylosing spondylitis and heart abnormalities: do cardiac conduction disorders, valve regurgitation and diastolic dysfunction occur more often in male patients with diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis for over 15 years than in the normal population?
Although they come from a wide range of scientific disciplines, these investigators have a common goal: to understand the fundamental basis for conduction disorders and to discover effective treatments that will improve the lives of millions of people worldwide with SCI, multiple sclerosis (MS), and related disorders.
The risk was also increased by a previous admission for conduction disorders. For COPD and pneumonia admissions, diagnosis of conduction disorders or dysrhythmias increased the risk of particulate matter [is less than] 10 [micro]m in aerodynamic diameter ([PM.sub.10])-associated admissions.
For each of the three admission categories (CVD, pneumonia, and COPD), we considered 10 causes (defined by a previous admission) as effect modifiers: COPD (ICD-9 code 490-496 except 493), asthma (ICD-9 code 493), acute bronchitis (ICD-9 code 466), acute respiratory illness (ICD-9 code 460-466), pneumonia (ICD-9 code 480-487), CVD (ICD-9 code 390-429), myocardial infarction (ICD-9 code 410), congestive heart failure (ICD-9 code 428), conduction disorders (ICD-9 code 426), and dysrhythmias (ICD-9 code 427).
Although left ventricular dysfunction is transient in TC, it may represent an anatomical substrate that triggers or facilitates severe ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disorders. The arrhythmogenesis and conduction disease accompanying TC in these cases occurred in the setting of profound QTc interval prolongation (786 ms and 743 ms, respectively).
Therefore, research strategies aimed at treatment of conduction disorders could mutually benefit MS patients and some of those with traumatic SCI.