conduction


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Related to conduction: electrical conduction, Heat conduction

conduction

 [kon-duk´shun]
conveyance of energy, as of heat, sound, or electricity.
aberrant ventricular conduction the temporary abnormal intraventricular conduction of supraventricular impulses; called also ventricular aberration.
aerial conduction (air conduction) conduction of sound waves to the organ of hearing in the inner ear through the air.
anterograde conduction
1. forward conduction of impulses through a nerve.
2. in the heart, conduction of impulses from atria to ventricles.
atrioventricular conduction (AV conduction) the conduction of atrial impulses through the atrioventricular node and the His-Purkinje system to the ventricles.
bone conduction conduction of sound waves to the inner ear through the bones of the skull.
concealed conduction conduction that is not seen on the surface electrocardiogram but may be detected by its effect on subsequent impulses; common examples are the incomplete penetration of the AV junction during atrial fibrillation, the Wenckebach type penetration during atrial flutter, and the retrograde incomplete penetration following ventricular ectopic beats.
decremental conduction a gradual decrease in the stimuli and response along a pathway of conduction; it occurs in nerve fibers with reduced membrane potentials.
retrograde conduction transmission of a cardiac impulse backward in the ventricular to atrial direction; particularly, conduction from the atrioventricular node into the atria.
saltatory conduction the rapid passage of an electric potential between the nodes of ranvier in myelinated nerve fibers, rather than along the full length of the membrane.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·duc·tion

(kon-dŭk'shŭn),
1. The act of transmitting or conveying certain forms of energy, such as heat, sound, or electricity, from one point to another, without evident movement in the conducting body.
2. The transmission of stimuli of various sorts by living protoplasm.
[L. con- duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

conduction

Cardiac pacing The passage of an electrical charge; the active propagation of a depolarization wave in the heart Physiology The transmission of nerve impulses. See Retrograde conduction.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·duc·tion

(kŏn-dŭk'shŭn)
1. The act of transmitting or conveying certain forms of energy, such as heat, sound, or electricity, from one point to another, without evident movement in the conducting body.
2. The transmission of stimuli of various sorts by living protoplasm.
3. The process by which a nerve impulse is transmitted.
[L. con-duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

conduction

the transmission of an electrical current by a conductor.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

con·duc·tion

(kŏn-dŭk'shŭn)
Transmitting or conveying energy, from one point to another, without evident movement in conducting body.
[L. con-duco, pp. ductus, to lead, conduct]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The key driving factors of bone conduction devices market include increase in technological advancements, growing preference by patients due to better comfort, and rise in demand for BAHA (Bone Anchored Hearing Aids).
These results indicate an association between severity of malnutrition with changes in nerve conduction. Nutritional deficiency affecting myelination of peripheral nerves might be the cause for significantly decreased sensory nerve conduction velocity in severely malnourished children, but whether these changes in nerve conduction can be reversed or not by nutritional rehabilitation needs to be evaluated by further studies.
Effect of vibrator to head coupling force on the auditory brainstem response to bone conduction clicks in newborn infants.
Nerve conduction is a better tool for detecting the early changes of neuropathy.
The major indication for pacemaker implantation in this study was found out to be other causes (sinus node dysfunction, degenerative diseases of conduction system).
"Thanks to this bone conduction technology, the sound levels which patients are exposed to can be minimised.
The stimulation intensity was 10-30 mA for sensory nerve conduction studies and 10-50 mA for motor nerve conduction studies.
This proves that conduction is allowing the wine to age and change much more rapidly than was previously thought.
Conclusion: L-I method has a good diagnostic sensitivity in CTS; however, P-W, median sensory nerve conduction velocity at digit I and median distal motor latency are more sensitive than L-I method.
Table 1 reveals that only 12.5% of the member farmer respondents reported that they participated in land contribution for the field demonstration and site provision for the conduction of Farmer Field School activities, whereas, an overwhelmingly majority (98.4%) of the respondents have participated in knowledge exchange with Farmer Field School members and provision of feed back to Farmer Field School, however, no one participated in fund sharing and entertainment contributions.
Conclusion: Ischemic heart disease was present in high frequency in patients with chronic conduction disorders and the most common artery involved was right coronary artery.
The bone conduction implantable hearing aid usually requires the patient to have a skull thickness of at least 8 millimetres; the young patient's skull was 1.5 millimetres.