conduct


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conduct

 [kon´dukt]
conduct disorder a form of disruptive behavior disorder of childhood and adolescence characterized by a persistent pattern of antisocial conduct, in which rights of others or age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. Misconduct may include aggression to people or animals, destruction of property, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules.
References in classic literature ?
Besides, fictitious narratives lead us to imagine the possibility of many events that are impossible; and even the most faithful histories, if they do not wholly misrepresent matters, or exaggerate their importance to render the account of them more worthy of perusal, omit, at least, almost always the meanest and least striking of the attendant circumstances; hence it happens that the remainder does not represent the truth, and that such as regulate their conduct by examples drawn from this source, are apt to fall into the extravagances of the knight-errants of romance, and to entertain projects that exceed their powers.
I will not hesitate, however, to avow my belief that it has been my singular good fortune to have very early in life fallen in with certain tracks which have conducted me to considerations and maxims, of which I have formed a method that gives me the means, as I think, of gradually augmenting my knowledge, and of raising it by little and little to the highest point which the mediocrity of my talents and the brief duration of my life will permit me to reach.
It is because you have not a mind large enough to see that there is anything better than your own conduct and your own petty aims."
Others suspect that two thirds will oppress the remaining third, and ask whether those gentlemen are made sufficiently responsible for their conduct; whether, if they act corruptly, they can be punished; and if they make disadvantageous treaties, how are we to get rid of those treaties?
The first readers of The Origin of Species accepted it with their reason; but their emotions, which are the ground of conduct, were untouched.
What is the one possible explanation of this otherwise unaccountable conduct? There is only one answer, and one explanation.
I was not sure that I had done right in speaking so harshly to him; but, at the time, I had felt irritated - almost insulted by his conduct; it seemed as if he was presuming upon the absence and neglect of my husband, and insinuating even more than the truth against him.
"It is very unfair to judge of any body's conduct, without an intimate knowledge of their situation.
This is the melancholy situation to which we have been brought by those very maxims and councils which would now deter us from adopting the proposed Constitution; and which, not content with having conducted us to the brink of a precipice, seem resolved to plunge us into the abyss that awaits us below.
"But is it the custom for the officers in the English navy to place themselves at the service of their female compatriots when they land in a port of Great Britain, and carry their gallantry so far as to conduct them ashore?"
of course; but that refers to our conduct towards each other.'
In the meantime Bertha Kircher was conducted the length of the plaza toward the largest and most pretentious of the buildings surrounding it.