conditioned stimulus


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stimulus

 [stim´u-lus] (L.)
any agent, act, or influence that produces functional or trophic reaction in a receptor or an irritable tissue.
conditioned stimulus a stimulus that acquires the ability to evoke a given response by repeatedly being linked with another stimulus that naturally evokes that response; see also conditioning.
depolarizing stimulus a stimulus that lowers the resting potential, making the inside of a fiber less negative. In cardiac fibers this means bringing the resting potential from −90 mV to −70 mV.
discriminative stimulus a stimulus associated with reinforcement, which exerts control over a given type of behavior; the subject must discriminate between closely related stimuli and respond positively only with this particular stimulus.
eliciting stimulus any stimulus, conditioned or unconditioned, that elicits a response.
threshold stimulus a stimulus that is just strong enough to elicit a response.
unconditioned stimulus any stimulus that naturally evokes a specific response; see also conditioning.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·di·tioned stim·u·lus

1. a stimulus applied to one of the sense organs (for example, receptors of vision, hearing, touch) that are an essential and integral part of the neural mechanism underlying a conditioned reflex;
2. a neutral stimulus, when paired with the unconditioned stimulus in simultaneous presentation to an organism, capable of eliciting a given response.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

conditioned stimulus

n. Psychology
A previously neutral stimulus that, after repeated association with an unconditioned stimulus, elicits the response effected by the unconditioned stimulus itself.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

con·di·tioned stim·u·lus

(kŏn-dish'ŭnd stim'yū-lŭs)
1. A stimulus applied to one of the sense organs that are an essential and integral part of the neural mechanism underlying a conditioned reflex.
2. A neutral stimulus, when paired with the unconditioned stimulus in simultaneous presentation to an organism, capable of eliciting a given response.
3. To improve one's physical state by exercise.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The dotted line at -4.0 s schematically represents the time of the reception of the "telepathic" conditioned stimulus; the dashed line at about -2.75 s represents the response to it; the solid line at 0 s is the unconditioned stimulus onset time; and the large peak beginning at about +1.5 s is the unconditioned response.
For Pavlov, learning was stimulus substitution; the conditioned stimulus (CS) substituted for the unconditioned stimulus (UCS).
Jansen's (1998) cue reactivity theory states that after systematic associations of cues (the conditioned stimulus, CS) with food (the unconditioned stimulus, US), the CS cues will reliably signal food.
edible as an unconditioned stimulus and praise as a conditioned stimulus) while requiring the participant to continuously look at the various visual stimuli on the pages for the specified time interval.
During conditioning, specimens of Hermissenda are presented with a temporal sequence of a light flash as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and mechanical turbulence as the unconditioned stimulus (US).
A transformation of respondently conditioned stimulus function in accordance with arbitrarily applicable relations.
For example, exposure to glutaraldehyde, a known irritant, is accompanied by an odor that could act as the conditioned stimulus. The odor, as the conditioned stimulus, then becomes associated with the irritative symptoms of glutaraldehyde, the unconditioned stimulus.
Initially designed to account for variations in the effectiveness of reinforcement in conditioning, the model was intended to explain variations in the strength of an associative link between a conditioned stimulus and a reinforcer (pavlovian conditioning) or between an action and its outcome (operant conditioning).
A possible explanation for these results starts out from considering that the DS, in turn, can acquire conditioned stimulus functions (that is, could function as a conditioned reinforcer), increasing the response rate in its presence (Williams & Dunn, 1991).
Reinstatement of fear to an extinguished conditioned stimulus: Two roles for context.
These neurons responded to both a conditioned stimulus, in this case a novel saccharine solution, and an unconditioned stimulus, in the form of lithium chloride that made rats sick.
One conditioned taste aversion experiment with rats assessed the impact of extinguishing a target conditioned stimulus (CS), S, in compound with a second CS, A, upon conditioned responding elicited by CS S when presented alone at test.