conditioned response


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conditioned response

 [kun-dish´und]
a response that does not occur naturally in the animal but that may be developed by regular association of some physiologic function with an unrelated outside event, such as ringing of a bell or flashing of a light. Soon the physiological function starts whenever the outside event occurs. Called also conditioned reflex. See also conditioning.

con·di·tion·ing

(kon-di'shŭn-ing),
1. The process of acquiring, developing, educating, establishing, learning, or training new responses in an individual. Used to describe both respondent and operant behavior; in both usages, refers to a change in the frequency or form of behavior as a result of the influence of the environment.
2. The application of a structured training program to prepare cardiovascular, muscular, and psychological readiness in human, canine, and equine athletes for competition or strenuous events.

con·di·tioned re·flex (CR),

a reflex that is gradually developed by training and association through the frequent repetition of a definite stimulus. See: conditioning.

conditioned response

n. Psychology
A new or modified response elicited by a stimulus after conditioning. Also called conditioned reflex.

conditioned response

an automatic reaction learned through training to a stimulus that does not normally elicit such response. Such responses can be physical or psychological and are produced by repeated association of some physiological function or behavioral pattern with an unrelated stimulus or event. In Pavlov's classic experiments, dogs learned to associate the sound of a ringing bell with feeding time so that they salivated at the sound of the bell, regardless of whether or not food was given to them. Also called acquired reflex, behavior reflex, conditioned reflex, trained reflex. Compare unconditioned response. See also classical conditioning, operant conditioning.

con·di·tioned re·sponse

(kŏn-dish'ŭnd rĕ-spons')
A response already in a person's repertoire but through repeated pairings with its natural stimulus, has been acquired or conditioned anew to a previously neutral or conditioned stimulus.
See: conditioning
Compare: unconditioned response

conditioned

educated by a conditioning process. See conditioning.

conditioned reinforcer
the pairing of a neutral stimulus with a primary, or natural, reinforcer.
conditioned response
a response that does not occur naturally in the animal but that may be developed by regular association of some physiological function with an unrelated outside event, such as ringing of a bell or flashing of a light. Soon the physiological function starts whenever the outside event occurs. Called also conditioned reflex. See also conditioning.

response

any action or change of condition evoked by a stimulus.

autoimmune response
the immune response in which antibodies or immune lymphoid cells are produced against the body's own tissues.
conditioned response
see also conditioned response, conditioning.
dazzle response
shining a bright light in the eye causes a blink. Called also dazzle reflex.
galvanic skin response
the alteration in the electrical resistance of the skin associated with sympathetic nerve discharge.
immune response
specifically altered reactivity of the animal body after exposure to antigen, manifested as antibody-production, cell-mediated immunity, development of hypersensitivity, or as immunological tolerance. Called also immune reaction. See also immune response.
maze response
a test of vision for animals.
placing response
see placing reflex.
response rate
in surveys, the number of completed survey instruments (questionnaires, interview records) divided by the total number of persons approached.
response trial
a field trial conducted to test a hypothesis, often about the cause of a disease but can encompass therapeutics or control of a disease. The hypothesis is tested by observing the response to an alteration in the system, e.g. in feeding or in management.
triple response (of Lewis)
a physiological reaction of the skin to stroking with a blunt instrument: first a red line develops at the site of stroking, owing to the release of histamine or a histamine-like substance, then a flare develops around the red line, and lastly a wheal is formed as a result of local edema.
unconditioned response
an unlearned response, i.e. one that occurs naturally. See also conditioning.
References in periodicals archive ?
The suggestion that reading time is important is supported by reports from participants following the experiment; the failure to acquire strong conditioned responses in the 1,000-ms group may have been due to insufficient time for the participants to respond to the statements.
75 s illustrates what we expect will be the conditioned response.
These trends are not antithetical to some sort of compensatory conditioned response in operation.
Thus, a disciplined approach to firearms training ensures that officers assess the suspect's actions prior to employing the conditioned response.
If she does in fact push Clare, that action is merely a conditioned response to the white voice of authority pronouncing "nigger," which, in accordance with the Plessy v.
The main behavioral modification technique used is a signal alarm device or moisture alarm, which helps a child gradually learn to associate bladder fullness with a conditioned response.
Mackworth theorized that the vigilance decrement was similar to the extinction of a conditioned response that was no longer reinforced: Participants made voluntary conditioned responses to signals but were not reinforced for their response; hence their rate of responding decreased.
But Pavlov's conditioned response might just as well explain many of these examples, even possibly the birds' nest-building behavior.
This conditioned response is most often devoid of content, producing no growth - emotional or intellectual.
Using biofeedback techniques, many patients have been able to develop a conditioned response that causes blood vessels in the hand to dilate, rather than constrict, when exposed to cold, thus eliminating the constant need to wear gloves.
While more amused than annoyed, he is convinced that the women's behavior is a conditioned response to the widespread assumption that all Black men encountered at night are potential muggers.
The finishing criteria for this phase were the appearance (and maintenance) of a stable level of touchscreen-pecking conditioned response (CR) in the presence of CS1, CS2, CS3 and CS4 stimuli and the lack of this response in the presence of CS5.